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NGT6 1315

More tech questions re Class DD51 and DE10 diesels

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NGT6 1315

Afternoon all!

 

I'm currently trying to make sense of the technical characteristics of these two mainstay JR diesels, and would appreciate any input by someone knowledgeable  :) .

 

As for the DE10, I am trying to make sense of the following paragraph from the Japanese Wikipedia article describing the peculiar bogie configuration on this class, which a Google translation makes only somewhat understandable...

 

 


線路規格の低い「丙線」での使用を考慮し軸重を13t以下に抑え、かつ、重量のある列車の入換作業にも使用可能な粘着力を得るため軸数を5軸に増加し、すべてを動軸とする。台車は推進軸の関係で無心皿となっており、3軸 + 2軸の構成で、3軸台車は曲線区間での横圧を低減するため各軸箱がリンクで連結され各1軸が独立して左右動できる連接構造である。このため、UIC式などの軸配置表記は3軸台車の各軸を独立

 

The translation offered by Google seems to indicate that on the six-wheel bogie, each wheelset is powered by a separate drive shaft from a central distribution gear. Can anyone with Japanese language skills tell me whether that would be correct? And perhaps, whether I am correct in assuming that each wheelset is thus suspended independently of the others, and possibly self-steering for better curve running to compensate for the relatively long wheelbase?

 

Concerning the DD51, I understand the centre bogie has a suspension adjustment device for changing the locomotive's axle load distribution in order to accommodate different route availabilities (to use a British railway term). Again, am I correct in this understanding?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Cheers,

Dom

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kvp

The DE10 has a 3 axle bogie that is completly flexible, meaing it can flex both horizontally and vertically. The main shaft goes in at one point and each axle has it's own gearing coming off from that, connected by flexible driveshafts. The 2 axle bogie has the same gearing, but in a rigid frame.

 

A few pictures:

http://ameblo.jp/aru-king/entry-11218622055.html

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NGT6 1315

The DE10 has a 3 axle bogie that is completly flexible, meaing it can flex both horizontally and vertically. The main shaft goes in at one point and each axle has it's own gearing coming off from that, connected by flexible driveshafts. The 2 axle bogie has the same gearing, but in a rigid frame.

 

A few pictures:

http://ameblo.jp/aru-king/entry-11218622055.html

 

Thank you! That sounds like a fairly complex design, but I do see the point in having this bogie designed with flexibility in two axes. Interesting photos there, too. I understand the bogies were inspected and revised at a different location than the locomotive's body?

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HantuBlauLOL

Hmm.. Golsdorf axles?

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kvp

 

I understand the bogies were inspected and revised at a different location than the locomotive's body?

They just switched them out, like you switch tires on a car. This happens with US locomotives too, sometimes even on the line.

 

 

Golsdorf axles?

No, they are fully independent, so work more like powered pony trucks. The trick is their suspension linkage, which keeps them aligned. It's a very good, but rather complex design. It's a self steering 3 axle bogie with a self equalizing axle load linkage.

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NGT6 1315

No, they are fully independent, so work more like powered pony trucks. The trick is their suspension linkage, which keeps them aligned. It's a very good, but rather complex design. It's a self steering 3 axle bogie with a self equalizing axle load linkage.

 

I'd quite like to have a look at a diagram of these bogies to understand how they are designed. Question is, what might be suitable search terms (in Japanese) which I could use?

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