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bikkuri bahn

Related to the recent announcement by Tramway of an HO scale 8600, a bit of vintage prototype footage.  Other than a few scenes in Wakamatsu in Kyushu in the beginning, the scenes are on the Gonou Line in Aomori, where these types were used on mixed trains.

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cteno4

Very nice old films

 

Thanks

 

Jeff

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marknewton

Good stuff, very inspirational, thanks to both of you. On those nights at work when its quiet I've been looking at photos and videos that show the whole train so I can draw up lists of typical train consists. These will both be useful for that.

 

All the best,

 

Mark.

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westfalen

I've noticed from this and other videos that mixed trains were common in Japan.  I wonder if they ran to as precise a schedule as everything else or if, like ours, they were subject to the vagaries of how much shunting was to be done enroute.  Was there a Japanese equivalent to Queensland Railway's notation in many columns of its timetable, "subject to cancellation or alteration without notice".

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bikkuri bahn

The mixed trains (called kongou ressha) were scheduled just the same as the passenger trains (and the freights for that matter), they were given appropriate pathings in the daiya.  In order to provide time for shunting, station stops were long (i.e. lots of padding).  I've listened to recordings of in-train announcments of mixed trains, and the station arrival times are announced without qualification just the same as if it was a regular passenger train (which makes sense, as the passengers relied on these trains to make connections).

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westfalen

The mixed trains (called kongou ressha) were scheduled just the same as the passenger trains (and the freights for that matter), they were given appropriate pathings in the daiya.  In order to provide time for shunting, station stops were long (i.e. lots of padding).  I've listened to recordings of in-train announcments of mixed trains, and the station arrival times are announced without qualification just the same as if it was a regular passenger train (which makes sense, as the passengers relied on these trains to make connections).

I never really thought that would be anything but the case in Japan.

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Nick_Burman

The mixed trains (called kongou ressha) were scheduled just the same as the passenger trains (and the freights for that matter), they were given appropriate pathings in the daiya.  In order to provide time for shunting, station stops were long (i.e. lots of padding).  I've listened to recordings of in-train announcments of mixed trains, and the station arrival times are announced without qualification just the same as if it was a regular passenger train (which makes sense, as the passengers relied on these trains to make connections).

 

One thing I haven't understood is how these mixed trains coped with fluctuations in the freight traffic - if a train had 45min allocated to do switching at a particular station and the crew found itself confronted with more switching that the time permitted, what did they do...aborted the operation half-way and departed with whatever cars could be gathered during the period?

 

Cheers NB

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