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Inspirational Scenery & Layouts

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Marcin

Amazing layouts!!!

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kvp

That's an interesting one. The posts around 2010 have more pictures about the main layout itself. http://imperial-railways.blog.so-net.ne.jp/archive/201012-1

One overview: http://imperial-railways.c.blog.so-net.ne.jp/_images/blog/_8ac/imperial-railways/IMG_8862.jpg?c=a1

and a rare build in progress one: http://imperial-railways.c.blog.so-net.ne.jp/_images/blog/_8ac/imperial-railways/m_IMG_5638.jpg?c=a1

Edited by kvp
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Densha

Looking at this layout again, I'm really surprised that they fit in a station for 6 cars. That said, I don't understand the track layout of that one at all. It's very confusing.

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kvp

It's a single track line with a 4 track station at the front. The two outer turnouts are in the curves. After the station it goes up the mountain, right to the top with the fake double track part where the back track is just an unused stub. The mountain station is there. Then it goes down in two turns again and crosses over to the right end of the main station. The two up and down loops are hidden in the mountain, except the small section above the left exit of the main station. The engine shed connects to the platformless 4th track, while there are other stub tracks at the ends of each siding. Nice design and very hard to follow, thanks to large parts of the tracks running in the mountain. The fake double track part has a turnout in the larger mountain and allows an extension at the top right. Another connection point is the bottom right stub at the station.

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Kabutoni

Some very well done Showa era local railway modules: http://tnkhdak.blog.so-net.ne.jp/2012-01-15

 

Ah yes, these were on this year's JAM! I'm kind of bummed out I didn't take so many pictures... Next year I'll go into it with more heart! Maybe it's because I had so little expectations, as last year's JAM wasn't so engaging. It's a fun project that started with one layout and expanded into into what it is now. Very inspiring stuff!

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bill937ca

A retractable layout with everything anchored down.  I see at least four good size trains running.

 

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kvp

It's too much of a racetrack to me, with 5 ovals and most turnouts only thrown in for decoration. Also the elevated line blocks the view for most of the ground level unless one looks almost straight down. (which is kinda ok for a tatami level layout) At least it allows around 5 trains with very limited storage yard/capacity and no operations besides circling and one up/down shuttle on the connecting ramp.

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cteno4

Nice job on the Murphy bed design.

 

Some like simple like this they are not into operations but like watching the trains go around.

 

Jeff

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NX:

A retractable layout with everything anchored down.  I see at least four good size trains running.

 

 

The more ideas and/or examples are available, the better.

Nice stuff.

 

Cheers,

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serotta1972

Made great use of space available - I like it!

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Blobby

It's too much of a racetrack to me, with 5 ovals and most turnouts only thrown in for decoration. Also the elevated line blocks the view for most of the ground level unless one looks almost straight down. (which is kinda ok for a tatami level layout) At least it allows around 5 trains with very limited storage yard/capacity and no operations besides circling and one up/down shuttle on the connecting ramp.

 

Regardless of a the watching trains go round versus operation debate one has to admit that it is a very tasty layout with a lot crammed into a moderate space (why no tram in the middle section?) -  what particularly interested me was how he has modelled the the ramp up to the elevated track. The point KVP raises about the elevated line blocking the view I find relevant since, I'm mooting a layout that has a similar elevated oval with the buildings/roads in the middle  and I can't decide just how much of a view blocker it actually is. I notice that this seems a fairly common format on Japanese layouts.  Any thoughts anyone?

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cteno4

I agree, lots of interesting scenes packed into a fairly small layout and then stored in a very small space!

 

It is a problem with the elevated lines blocking views in the inside of the loop, but I've come to like that and think it's good. A layout scene should not give everything away in one view. Part of the fun is to get new bit from different views of the layout. I think the same goes for track as well, it's fun for the trains to go from any particular view for a while. I've seen folks build the center of the layouts up a lot but then you loose the idea of the elevated lines that are so interesting in Japanese scenes.

 

Our clubs design for our next layout will have elevated double viaduct that will some of the Lower inside the loop scene there,mbut can be seen from other angles. We discovered this worked well when we did the NYC grand central layout and this layout is based on that design. The view is made to be seen from one of the long sides and ends, other long side is more of the operations and storage area with the scenery elements heavy there on the backside of the viaduct seen from the other side. The low center scene thoug could be seen at different angles and watching folks view the layout they would walk all around and keep looking and looking. Many mentioned that they were surprised as they kept looking they saw new stuff and they really enjoyed that. I think this also plays well into the mind's eye as it then gets even more into extending scenes from memory (that's very powerful) and also walking away with the feeling there was even more there they may not have seen even if there wasn't!

 

It does mean yo do have to have the layouts at more desk height and view with a bit more gods eye view than the more at eye level, look at the scene in profile. Of course if you primarily want the profile view then that's a whole nother can of works for layout design.

 

Some say they don't want to make their layouts for others to view but just them, but I think all these things follow for even your own only you viewed layouts that you should make yourself look at the layout from different places (control panels tend to root one to jsut that view of a layout) and play with your own minds eye as the more it is satisfied and kept looking for more and dreaming up more the less boring the layout will be to you and the greater your enthusiasm to work on it and play with it!

 

Cheers,

 

Jeff

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katoftw

The elevated track only blocks view from one direct of view. It isn't a problem.

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railsquid

Regardless of a the watching trains go round versus operation debate one has to admit that it is a very tasty layout with a lot crammed into a moderate space (why no tram in the middle section?) -  what particularly interested me was how he has modelled the the ramp up to the elevated track. The point KVP raises about the elevated line blocking the view I find relevant since, I'm mooting a layout that has a similar elevated oval with the buildings/roads in the middle  and I can't decide just how much of a view blocker it actually is. I notice that this seems a fairly common format on Japanese layouts.  Any thoughts anyone?

 

I guess it will depend on how high your baseboards are and what your normal viewing height is, but on my layout I don't find it much of a problem.

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JR 500系

Hey great design! Stores away sweetly, no one will know where they are!  :)

 

But you do have to make sure everything is glued in tightly... although being stored up have its advantages of dust prevention...

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Blobby

I agree, lots of interesting scenes packed into a fairly small layout and then stored in a very small space!

It is a problem with the elevated lines blocking views in the inside of the loop, but I've come to like that and think it's good. A layout scene should not give everything away in one view. Part of the fun is to get new bit from different views of the layout. I think the same goes for track as well, it's fun for the trains to go from any particular view for a while. I've seen folks build the center of the layouts up a lot but then you loose the idea of the elevated lines that are so interesting in Japanese scenes.

Our clubs design for our next layout will have elevated double viaduct that will some of the Lower inside the loop scene there,mbut can be seen from other angles. We discovered this worked well when we did the NYC grand central layout and this layout is based on that design. The view is made to be seen from one of the long sides and ends, other long side is more of the operations and storage area with the scenery elements heavy there on the backside of the viaduct seen from the other side. The low center scene thoug could be seen at different angles and watching folks view the layout they would walk all around and keep looking and looking. Many mentioned that they were surprised as they kept looking they saw new stuff and they really enjoyed that. I think this also plays well into the mind's eye as it then gets even more into extvending scenes from memory (that's very powerful) and also walking away with the feeling there was even more there they may not have seen even if there wasn't!

It does mean yo do have to have the layouts at more desk height and view with a bit more gods eye view than the more at eye level, look at the scene in profile. Of course if you primarily want the profile view then that's a whole nother can of works for layout design.

Some say they don't want to make their layouts for others to view but just them, but I think all these things follow for even your own only you viewed layouts that you should make yourself look at the layout from different places (control panels tend to root one to jsut that view of a layout) and play with your own minds eye as the more it is satisfied and kept looking for more and dreaming up more the less boring the layout will be to you and the greater your enthusiasm to work on it and play with it!

Cheers,

Jeff

Hi Jeff

 

Interesting reply, thanx - I'd be very interested to see any photos of the GC layout - my ho passion is (or would be if i had the space) NYC particularly their west side freight line which I think was a totally amazing line - I have a fair bit of NYC kit and live in hopes!

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kvp

my ho passion is (or would be if i had the space) NYC particularly their west side freight line

This is between the Spuyten Duyvil bridge down to the south end of the meatpacking district? Which era would you choose, before or after the grade separation on the southern end? I'm asking as i think the elevated section would make a great narrow shelf diorama with the line going through the buildings and two fiddle yards on the ends (one in the southern freight terminal and the other behind the tunnel around west 35th street), with some strategic omissions, like the Hudson yards area.

 

Our clubs design for our next layout will have elevated double viaduct that will some of the Lower inside the loop scene there,mbut can be seen from other angles. We discovered this worked well when we did the NYC grand central layout and this layout is based on that design. 

The only one with a similar look i could find was the NYC Transit Museum's huge layout. Did you build that?

Edited by kvp

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Blobby

This is between the Spuyten Duyvil bridge down to the south end of the meatpacking district? Which era would you choose, before or after the grade separation on the southern end? I'm asking as i think the elevated section would make a great narrow shelf diorama with the line going through the buildings and two fiddle yards on the ends (one in the southern freight terminal and the other behind the tunnel around west 35th street), with some strategic omissions, like the Hudson yards area.

After the grade separation - I've always had a thing about elevated lines (hence the Japanese interest) - and the elevated section of the west side freight line has to be one of the most interesting ever. Agreed it would be a brilliant shelf layout - I've seen several models of bits of it over the years, one was a very tasty diorama, the other was a layout about 10 by 10 it started with a car float went round an oval and up to an elevated section (was in MR some years back) - I actually started on this and got all the track laid but then we moved to a smaller house and I had to scrap it. There was also another good NYC layout in MR by a guy called (I think) Mike Parmiter a retired cop - it was S gauge and was basically a large oval, it featured the Park Lane Tunnel, the bridge over the Harlem River and some elevated track to. I used to drool over that particular one! 

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Blobby

This is the layout I was modelling - had a bit of a shock when i saw it was 1989! Did moot retrying in n but not really enough NYC equipment around

post-3155-0-49356800-1478633275_thumb.jpeg

post-3155-0-75779600-1478633295_thumb.jpeg

post-3155-0-42461200-1478633323_thumb.jpeg

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cteno4

Blobby,

 

Sorry I think a misunderstanding, our club did a Japanese layout for a japan week event that was held at grand central station, the model wasn't NYC based! But it was a more classic Japanese layout with loop of modules with two ground tracks and double viaduct elevated shinkansen lines.

 

I've been trying to find the photos of that layout (we built it and only used it at the one show) as mine went poof into the terabytes on my drives and the other member who shot pictures has misplaced his cd of them... Unfortunately there were only three of us who went up to NYC for the show and it was such an active show (the best show we have ever done hands down) that we realized afterwards we hardly took any photos!

 

Jeff

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Blobby

Blobby,

 

Sorry I think a misunderstanding, our club did a Japanese layout for a japan week event that was held at grand central station, the model wasn't NYC based! But it was a more classic Japanese layout with loop of modules with two ground tracks and double viaduct elevated shinkansen lines.

 

I've been trying to find the photos of that layout (we built it and only used it at the one show) as mine went poof into the terabytes on my drives and the other member who shot pictures has misplaced his cd of them... Unfortunately there were only three of us who went up to NYC for the show and it was such an active show (the best show we have ever done hands down) that we realized afterwards we hardly took any photos!

 

Jeff

 

Hi Jeff -  what a fab place to display a model railway whatever it portrays - I'm firmly into Japanese n urban layouts now but i the back of my mind is the thought that I have a fair bit of HO NYC equipment - not to mention an aristocraft G gauge NYC RS3! Sadly in the digital age it is very easy to lose photos as I know only too well

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