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Azumanga Davo

10-366 Sleeper Question

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Azumanga Davo

Hi guys, I'm Dave and very much new to modelling this particular geographical location, so please bear with me for questions that to some may be blatantly obvious. :D

 

I recently purchased a Kato 10-366 7 Car Sleeper Train to run with the Hokutosei EF81.  It's probably not correct, but space with the layout meant that my choice would be based less on being correct anyway.

 

My question concerns coach 23-6 (flat end coach with rear window, lights and destination marker).  Since I don't have much knowledge on how sleeper trains run, how did this coach get used in typical operation?  Was the set split for shunting, or did the train get split for another destination?  Any info on how these trains run on a daily basis is much appreciated.

 

PS  Hope to have layout progress photos real soon for another day.

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bikkuri bahn

Dave, the 20 series were the first Blue Train stock built, from 1958 to 1970.  They were never used on Hokutosei services, but as you say, it's not important really when you're restricted for whatever reasons.  As you surmised, the nahanefu 23 type was built to enable trains to be broken or re-formed enroute, which I believe was quite common especially on routes to Kyushu.  I can dig up more info later, if you wish.

 

btw, the 20 series are my favorite blue train stock.  The original brochures for these rolling stock are wonderful.

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Azumanga Davo

I had that feeling, the set just happened to be handy in the local shop.  More info would be most welcome (hope I'm not too much trouble though). :)

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linkey

More info would be most welcome (hope I'm not too much trouble though). :)

 

No-one is in trouble for asking questions, suggestions, advice or ideas. This is how we all help each other out. BB can really help you on this as for me I'm semi-modern to now running (which some are now retired) rolling stock. I do have the Nihonkai sleeping train on order so that would be very different in my list of consists that I have.

 

cheers

Sarah

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bikkuri bahn

A little more digging, and it appears the nahanefu 23 type was actually built to replace coach seat cars on the ltd. express overnight trains Fuji and Hakutsuru, when these trains became all sleeping cars sometime after 1964.  The flat ends and diaphragm passageways were helpful for connecting with other cars, but perhaps this was a byproduct of economizing by using intermediate car body shells, and simply adding a guard's (conductor) room and hand brake. In the seventies, as new rolling stock was introduced, these cars were cascaded to other services, most notably the blue train "Akebono", which there is much photographic record. When the Akebono upgraded to more modern stock, the 23's were used on overnight express services.

 

Train consists of the blue train "Asakaze", from the first half of the 1970's, this train was a Tokyo-Hakata overnight train, which ran in sections.  Some but not all trains split in two at Shimonoseki, with the front half left at Shimonoseki, and the second half with a "23" continuing on to Hakata:

 

http://www.noble-joker.com/nj_home/@4henseihyou/henseihyou_4/asakaze1.htm

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Azumanga Davo

Very interesting, glad I found the forum as it's proving to be a very valuable and rare resource I can draw from.  Thanks again.

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miyakoji

Dave, the 20 series were the first Blue Train stock built, from 1958 to 1970.  They were never used on Hokutosei services, but as you say, it's not important really when you're restricted for whatever reasons.  As you surmised, the nahanefu 23 type was built to enable trains to be broken or re-formed enroute, which I believe was quite common especially on routes to Kyushu.  I can dig up more info later, if you wish.

 

btw, the 20 series are my favorite blue train stock.  The original brochures for these rolling stock are wonderful.

Thanks for the link Bikkuri, from there you can click on the 20系 link and see a few interior photos of these cars.  The history of the services and the loads of variations on the rolling stock is interesting.

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