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Claude_Dreyfus

Kanjiyama - An N gauge Japanese Terminus Layout

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Claude_Dreyfus

Hmm, thanks for that; gives me something to think about. That is a nice little layout, with a great atmosphere. I do wonder if it is a little too 'clean' though...that weed-covered platform looks very neat! A case of well-tended neglect!

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Claude_Dreyfus

Finally there was a sufficient a gap in the rain to transplant Kanjiyama from the back of the car to the shed. Based on the last few posts, I decided to do some work on the far end of the platforms to reflect the fact Kanjiyama is now served by shorter trains than when it was a through station.

 

My aim is for the JR East to have at least made some effort in maintaining the platforms, after all there are some longer excursion trains which come up the branch line. Also the foot crossing needs to be maintained, as it is still in use. The Kanjiyama line, however, doesn't run more than two-coach trains, so most of platform 3 has been left to rack and ruin. Some fairly large weeds are growing through the carpet of grass and other growth.

 

These pictures were taken on my phone, so aren't the greatest quality.

 

2014-04-06153939_zpsb1ad4f59.jpg

 

2014-04-06154006_zpse68bf751.jpg

 

The tracks also still look very clean; especially the Kanjiyama line. I think I need to add a few more weeks.

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Claude_Dreyfus

Another weekend, and another show; another N Gauge show as well.

 

As mentioned in my earlier post, Kanjiyama had a couple of minor scenic tweaks around the station area, particularly the platforms. Also, the Kanjiyama line had a bit more greenery between the tracks. Finally, some long grass and plant-life has started to sprout between the tracks for platforms 1 and 2.

 

Unusually the show had a large amount of Japanese stuff for sale. Almost all of it was ancient - i.e. 20+ year old multiple units and locomotives, but there were some carriages worth getting, so Kanjiyama now has eight (yes, I know, too many for the layout) carriages, which feature in some of the pictures below. 

 

Diesels2_zpse09cfddf.jpg

 

Diesels_zps66da1d54.jpg

 

KiHa58_zps0a8200b0.jpg

 

Kanjiyama_zps864b4619.jpg

 

C11_zps3c427779.jpg

 

 

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Fenway Park

Hi

Don't worry about the number of coaches, as you are modelling a private railway with the occasional SL tourist working. The surplus can be stored on sidings awaiting developments.

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JR 500系

Nice Claude! Thanks for sharing!

 

It's so fun to host a train show and run trains with fellow interest friends!

 

I like the terrain, very well done indeed!

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Densha

I'm wondering how you made your concrete/asphalt streets...

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Claude_Dreyfus

There are three steps to constructing the roads.

 

Firstly, when the initial form-work was constructed (using hardboard mainly) the road bases were marked out on the raised sections and cut into the wood where necessary. The edges of the roads in the town area are marked out with narrow pieces of micro-strip.

 

Once marked out, the roads were covered by a thin layer of plaster, which was sanded down once dry. Finally, they were painted with a special textured paint I bought from an artist/architectural supply shop just around the corner from where I work.

 

http://modelshop.co.uk/

 

The paint in question is this stuff...

 

http://modelshop.co.uk/Shop/Finishes/Textured-finishes/Item/Texture-paint-125ml-Light-tarmac/ITM3450

 

I find many roads on N gauge layouts far too dark...this paint is just the right shade. The texture is a little too coarse for N Gauge, but more attention from the sandpaper smooths it out a bit. A few markings are in place, as well as drains and the like. One of the to-do activities is to add more markings, but these will probably need to be painted on as transfers don't get on with the rough surface.

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Claude_Dreyfus

A few weeks ago I got fed up with the perspex around the layout, so got shot of it. One thing I did find was yard area became very exposed, especially at the far end. To help protect the yard, I have added a new backscene...

 

IMG_3026_zps888b0acf.jpg

 

 

IMG_3027_zps6f748eef.jpg

 

The image for scene is actually a photograph of the rock face behind the yard, taken in the highest resolution possible. Based on my usual MO, the image was pasted onto a spreadsheet and resized to fit onto a couple of A4 sheets of paper, which were fitted to a sheet of hardboard, which had been painted black to match the rest of the layout edging. The colours don't match completely sadly; my printer ain't great, but the photos do over-emphasise this...

 

The fence was dug out from my bits box, which fortunately was the correct length. It was given a coat of diluted brown paint. 

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Densha

On the road construction: thanks for the explanation but it's a bit difficult to get that special textured paint. I'll try the plaster thing at least...

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Claude_Dreyfus

To be honest, the texture in the paint is only of limited value for N gauge. I believe the smoothed plaster should give a sufficient amount of texture, but it needs a lot of attention from various grades of sandpaper. I mainly like this paint for the colour.

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cteno4

Densha,

 

you might like the road making technique of using craft foam rubber sheets (here its called funfoam or flexifoam usually) about 2mm thick. you can cut this out to make your roads to shape (nice as it can cover up slightly uneven surfaces) and then glue it down. then paint with a mixture of acrylic craft paint, water, and plaster powder to the texture you want. put on a pretty thick coat. then you can come back and push down on the paint and the give of the foam under the paint will allow it to crack a bit so you can do pretty cool cracks. also you can easily pick out pot holes as well.

 

http://www3.telus.net/public/crowley/ashphalt_roads.htm

 

cheers

 

jeff

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Claude_Dreyfus

This certainly looks a good technique, however does it run the risk of being a little too fragile?

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cteno4

My little test but on a hunk of cardboard held up well. Painting is done after gluing the foam down. Granted you can't plat an elbow with weight on it w/o cracking your road all up! The fun foam os pretty dense stuff, not like soft foam rubber. More like train insert foam.

 

Jeff

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Claude_Dreyfus

Kanjiyama went out to play today at our club's open day; celebrating our 50th anniversary. Being an open day, as opposed an exhibition, prototypical adherence was not maintained particularly well!

 

post-109-0-55710300-1401646127_thumb.jpg

Tomix 300 series

 

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Kato 700 series

 

Without fail, when Kanjiyama goes out to exhibitions I am asked if I have any Bullets...so today two sets were used. They were only short sets - 4 carriages - as a full-length Tokaido/Sanyo line Bullet is about the same length as the layout itself!

 

The layout now has the summer off - time to try to fit the auto uncoupling system to the branch line - with its next show planned for the Gaugemaster Open day in September. For those that do not know, Gaugemaster is the UK wholesaler of Kato, and Kanjiyama is attending (representing the Japanese Railway Society) to demonstrate some of their products. 

 

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Kabutoni

Without fail, when Kanjiyama goes out to exhibitions I am asked if I have any Bullets...so today two sets were used. They were only short sets - 4 carriages - as a full-length Tokaido/Sanyo line Bullet is about the same length as the layout itself!

 

Next time, bring a KIHA85 or some other flashy Ltd. Express DMU to appease the audience ;)

 

The Shinkansen on the local platforms give the layout kind of a French feeling, since the TGV also tends to run on rural lines: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5186/5620833609_8bda5b85e1.jpg

Edited by Toni Babelony

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miyakoji

A few more types that come to mind that would be somewhat prototypically accurate would be the 681/683 series Thunderbirds, or the 373 series Shinano.  They look a little like mini-shinkansens, but they go out to the countryside and somewhere along their fairly long routes, they might stop at rural locations like you've modeled.  Not sure what the shortest correct formation would be, though.

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JR 500系

Yes yes bring on the Kiha-40 Fox, Squid and Crab car sure to wow audiences. How about some Tomytec painted carriages that are single car too? Sorry but having the 300 and 700 on Kanjiyama looks kinda weird...  

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Densha

Why not just mini-Shinkansen E3 and E6's? They're Shinkansen but can be used on very rural layouts.

 

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kvp

Why not just mini-Shinkansen E3 and E6's? They're Shinkansen but can be used on very rural layouts.

It might have something to do with the fact that Kanjiyama is a non electrified station. Of course, that can be added, at least to the JR platforms. However the wide view hida would be a nice and prototypical set for a strictly dmu line and it fits the platforms with all cars.

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Densha

Yeah, but the 681/683 and 373 series are EMU's as well. Either way, most non-Japanese layouts don't even feature overhead poles and still run electric trains, so I guess many visitors to events wouldn't even notice it.

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Claude_Dreyfus

Wow, lots of debate!  :)

 

Being a club open day, it was a case of running weird stuff and pleasing a crowd, who have a clear idea of what a bullet looks like - i.e. one of the Tokaido blue and white examples. Quite a few have seen the 0 series driving trailer at our National Railway museum at York; so recognise the colour.

 

When Kanjiyama is operating 'properly' a very restricted fleet is used. Rest assured, overhead electric stuff is not used during shows!

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miyakoji

Yeah, but the 681/683 and 373 series are EMU's as well. Either way, most non-Japanese layouts don't even feature overhead poles and still run electric trains, so I guess many visitors to events wouldn't even notice it.

ah right, I was forgetting about the matter of electrification :blush:

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Claude_Dreyfus

As a post-script to my pictures from our club open day, Kanjiyama appeared in the local rag, illustrating a article covering our open day. The kid is nothing to do with me, and was unlucky enough to be standing by the layout when the photographer turned up... He was descended upon - along with Mother - leaving a rather bemused operator wondering what was going on as small child was being shunted around to various posing points around the layout.  

 

Paper_zpsfe8ca1b8.jpg

 

 

Just to offend the purists, the third Bullet to come out to play (a Kato 500 series) starred in this picture! Certainly the train drew his attention (and why not...it is cool), but I suspect we do not have a potential future J-Trains modeller in the making; I think he found it rather traumatic having a camera shoved in his face...this is probably the only picture without him displaying a world-class frown!

Edited by Claude_Dreyfus
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Claude_Dreyfus

Just by way of an update; Kanjiyama is planned to feature in the October edition of Continental Modeller.

 

http://www.pecopublications.co.uk/continental-modeller.html

 

This is due to hit the shops in mid-September.

 

I have recently been taking lots of pictures to supply to the magazine in support of the article.

 

EveningArrival_zpsae065b1e.jpg

 

As an aside; the layout has a few exhibitions planned over the coming year or so, most notably The International N Gauge Show (TINGS) in September 2015.

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