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Krackel Hopper

Sankei Paper Kits

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cteno4

I also learned to scan the instructions and blow them up as they are tiny and minimal so hard to look at quick and you do need to do some thinking while looking at them...

 

Nah that's just old age... Even I have noticed huge loss in dexterity with my fingers and end up fumbling and dropping many, many tiny parts.

 

no the dexterity is still there for me, eyes gone a little bit, but glasses and magnifying lamp more than make up for that on the fine work if needed. its the sankei directions, on the police station the whole instruction sheet was 0.75" x 1.5", no kidding! larger structures are a bit better at like 4" x 10", but still small for something that you do need to look at more than the usual plastic model kit as part orientation is not marked or no tabs or dimples, or ridges to lock parts in place! wall ends usually need to be aligned by like 1mm offsets to create the dado joints for the wall corners so you do need to beware and thinking of these while assembling/gluing!

 

cheers

 

jeff

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marknewton

Some useful tips there, thanks for sharing them Jeff.

 

On the subject of ridge tiles, I saw an interesting thread on another forum. The bloke there scratchbuilt his this way:

 

"So they are home made with plasticard rods and strips. First method is to take a 2.5 or 3 mm rod and remove half with a file (I haven't found half round rods in my favorite shops) Second method is to take a 2.5 or 3 mm tube and slice it in two parts using a good scalpel. Small strips are bent to shape then glued at regular intervals."

 

file.php?id=48195

 

file.php?id=50288

 

Fiddly, I agree, but very effective looking.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

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WuZhuiQiu

@marknewton: Thanks for the links!

 

The HO tile sheet looks a bit like hongawarabuki in the photograph, although the drawing implies that it  may be sangawarabuki instead.

 

Sangawarabuki:

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/image/10138126a/20/1

 

The older design of tile roof (hongawarabuki) entailed separate convex and concave tiles (covertiles and pantiles), while the newer design (sangawarabuki) uses tiles that each incorporate both convex and concave portions.

 

Once your order arrives, could you please let us know which type of tile is represented?

 

Yes, that thatched roofing looks very effective, although I fear that it may involve the use of the legendary "plumber's felt" that used to be available in the UK, but not in North America.

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cteno4

Mark,

 

nice! thanks! close to what i have on the roof i was trying to patch. problem is i would probably need to do all the ridges the same then!

 

i opted to just tear a hole in the roof, put in some framing and am working on having it under repair!

 

cheers

 

jeff

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marknewton

WuZhuiQiu, I'll let you know as soon as the package arrives. I think you're right about the Pendon thatched roofs, I now recall seeing mention somewhere that they were made using plumber's hemp. I've actually used this material to make clumps of long grass. It's still available here in Australia if that's of any use to you. Makes me wonder whether you could substitute the sort of stuff that is sold as long grass by Woodland Scenics and the like?

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

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marknewton
i opted to just tear a hole in the roof, put in some framing and am working on having it under repair!

 

Clever - I like your style!  :laugh:

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

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WuZhuiQiu

I checked my old e-mail messages, and here is some information about the product that I had been looking for:

 

*日本瓦 **KJ-0269*

  200×250ミリ

  1/50 1枚入

  \1,575 (税込)

 

Unfortunately, Ayano at Hiruma Model Craft ( http://hiruma-modelcraft.com [?]) had confirmed in 2006 that it was already out of production...

 

It has been used in models such as these:

 

http://www.oshiromodelterrain.co.uk/jp/japanese.html

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marknewton

Some nice modelling there. The HO tiles represent sangawarabuki, and they're rather nice mouldings. Once I finish mucking around with my Enoden car kitbash, I'll try them out on a Sankei structure.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

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WuZhuiQiu

Some nice modelling there.

 

Yes, it is - I'm going to be ordering some as scenery for a 4th Kawanakajima game.

 

The HO tiles represent sangawarabuki, and they're rather nice mouldings. Once I finish mucking around with my Enoden car kitbash, I'll try them out on a Sankei structure.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

 

Thanks for that detail! I suppose that I may have to scratch-build, then.

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rankodd

Wowzers!!! Arrggggh they're killing me!!

 

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10143817

 

That's a nice looking kit, but a little too European for my layout.

 

Edit: ACK! Just noticed the price! $50+ for a 9cmx9cmx7.2cm kit.  :confused2:

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bikkuri bahn

Wowzers!!! Arrggggh they're killing me!!

 

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10143817

 

That's a nice looking kit, but a little too European for my layout.

 

Edit: ACK! Just noticed the price! $50+ for a 9cmx9cmx7.2cm kit.  :confused2:

 

That's because it's a model of the bakery seen in the Miyazaki Hayao Movie "Kiki's Delivery Service", which has a pseudo-European setting.  Good movie, by the way, with a nice scene of a train hauled by a cab unit in the EE or EMD style.

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keitaro

bit of trivia but that kiki's building can be found in tasmania as can alot of ghibli stuff in australia.

 

i bought some of these kits can't wait to get my hands on one.

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rankodd

Wowzers!!! Arrggggh they're killing me!!

 

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10143817

 

That's a nice looking kit, but a little too European for my layout.

 

Edit: ACK! Just noticed the price! $50+ for a 9cmx9cmx7.2cm kit.  :confused2:

 

That's because it's a model of the bakery seen in the Miyazaki Hayao Movie "Kiki's Delivery Service", which has a pseudo-European setting.  Good movie, by the way, with a nice scene of a train hauled by a cab unit in the EE or EMD style.

 

Yeah - I loved that film. I was tempted to get it just because it was Kiki's bakery, but at that price I'll be passing on it twice. Gotta wonder what the license fees were on that - it's at least twice the price of their other N-Scale kits. The other Miyazaki house (From Totoro) is 4300+ yen as well. Ouch!

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clem24

To be fair, given the complexity of these kits compared to their normal kits, I don't think the price is completely out of line. It's probably Y500 - Y1,000 overpriced but like you say, it has to cover the cost of licensing. Anyway I am very very very very tempted by this. I wonder where I can find a mini Kiki and Jiji...

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rankodd

To be fair, given the complexity of these kits compared to their normal kits, I don't think the price is completely out of line. It's probably Y500 - Y1,000 overpriced but like you say, it has to cover the cost of licensing. Anyway I am very very very very tempted by this. I wonder where I can find a mini Kiki and Jiji...

 

To be fair, an N-scale Jiji would have to be around 2mm long. :)

 

OTOH, I'd love to be able to get N-scale anime figures. Closest thing available are the Fujimoto Maid Girls (With Nekomimi! http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10090758), but it's not the same. There were some To Heart figures a while back, but they're utterly unavailable now.

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Tecchan
To be fair, an N-scale Jiji would have to be around 2mm long. :)

 

After seeing cranes (bird not construction things lol), chairs and all the pictures from Kamiyacho, I feel like anything is possible! :-)

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Claude_Dreyfus

I have been seriously considering soem of these for my small terminus layout. My only reservation is how they will cope in the wide ranging temperature of my shed. It is dry in there, but gets cold in the winter, and rather hot in the summer.

 

That said, I could always make them removable... :grin

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keitaro

pics

 

one thing i'd like to mention is once you glue a piece make sure you're doing it right u will see why in the pic below

post-484-13569927857525_thumb.jpg

post-484-13569927863107_thumb.jpg

post-484-13569927863898_thumb.jpg

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Dani

Hello,

 

But reading "paper kit" scares a little bit... seems with much less durability than a plastic one...

 

What is your impression? How long will these kits last? Same than plastic ones? Do you spray them with a varnish or similar when finished?

 

Thanks,

 

Dani.

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cteno4

Dani,

 

the Sankei kits are not "paper" but a high density chipboard that is laser cut.  this stuff is pretty stiff to begin with and then the sankei (and many of the higher quality laser cut kits) design is to layer 2-4 layers of this chipboard for each wall. this layering gives you added details around openings (doors, windows) with some relief and also color contrasts. this significantly stiffens them up a lot. laminating layers does a lot to help stop warping and give you stiffening w/o making a super thick wall.

 

if your train environment goes through large cycles of humidity you might get some warping. this is always up for some debate. some feel they never see warping in their chipboard structures, some think they see a lot.

 

in any case you can try to avoid this by stiffening the interior of these buildings more using some sheet styrene and strips of either styrene or bass wood you can get at the hobby shop. running some strips along the walls at a couple of spots can stiffen things a lot. some folks cut out a chunk of sheet styrene just a tad smaller than the wall and cut out the opening holes a bit larger and glue this to the back of the holes. this can entail a bit of work though, but its nothing that has to be super exact, but you then need to start to think about if white is ok inside your building or not and if it needs to be painted before installation. you probably dont want to paint chipboard as you are asking it to warp and potentially swell some. best to use markers if you ever need to do some color touch up here or there.

 

even styrene warps with time. i frequently have to bend tomytec bases and walls straight before assembly as they have warped (probably from temperature i would guess or something not quite right with injection moulding process).

 

some do hit their paper kits with light coats of dull coat, but you have to be careful if you seal only one side of a material that can suck up water or it will warp as only one side then can exchange water with the air, so would probably be best to also do the interior as well. also you need to coat it lightly and not soak the building or you could cause some warping there from the varnish itself. layers of light misting of the structure would be the way.

 

one other thing to watch out for is your glue. white glue does work well on these kits, but too much of it can soak in and potentially swell or warp edges. so far i have used solvent based wood model airplane glue and thick CA glue in assemblies, but am planning on trying white glues but will use the thick 'tacky' white glues you can get at the craft stores. these have less water and are much stickier and dry faster. nice thing about these glues that they are pretty stiff when dry so fillets behind corner joints will help add support and layers between wall layers will also help stiffen things.

 

ive had a few smaller sankei kits ive built sitting around now for a year or so and they have not warped with no extra structural support or varnish. as i start building kits ill see how well the walls seem to do once assembled to see if i think they need more stiffening. you can always come back later and add stiffening if you dont totally glue the building in place.

 

cheers

 

jeff

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John P Boogerd

Well, I'm going to order some Sankei kits in HO - thanks to this thread I now know that these aren't really paper kits and how to assemble them - thanks everyone!

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Mr Frosty

Is white PVA glue the preferred adhesive for these kits?

Previously when making paper models, I have used Tissue Cement used for model aircraft and Aliphatic Resin, but the latter is a penetrating glue.

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cteno4

yep ive used pva on them fine. i usually use the "tacky" white glue you get at the craft store (one brand name is arleenes but there are lots out there). they seem to just be thicker than standard white glue and thus a bit stickier so thing hold themselves in place better and the glue does not spread as much or penetrate into the chipboard too much. also it can give you a good fillet of glue to strengthen things in corners, etc. it also dries faster.

 

ive also used wood model cement and even thick super glue as well, but im now liking the tacky white pva glue the best. seems to be the least messy, less prone to issues of penetration and discoloration, and not smelly. also super cheap!

 

some little spring clamp forceps also help to hold things while drying.

 

one thing, make sure to lightly number your parts in pencil on the back sides as once cut up it can be hard to tell which part should go where and some walls have multiple layers with pieces that can be really close in size.

 

there is something really zen about building these kits over plastic models...

 

cheers

 

jeff

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