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ItsTheMatrix

New to N scale trains. Some questions.

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ItsTheMatrix

Hello, I have always loved trains but the Japanese trains they have are in my opinion some of the best high tech advanced machines I have ever seen, would be honored just to be next to them but living in the states unfortunately its just out of the question. My favorites so far are the e259 series and e353 series. I like their aggressive and modern look. My question is I bought my first train, its the first car museum e259 series model from Tomix. I see that it says display model only and I totally dig that, I think it looks very nice on its own however I was wondering if there was any way I can convert this by buying a chassis with a motor for it? If so which part number would that be? If not I guess Ill have to buy the basic set. Another question, kato vs tomix? which is more accurate? 

 

EDIT: wow someone had almost the same exact question as mine in another thread but did not ask the question of converting the first car museum series. 

Edited by ItsTheMatrix

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railsquid
53 minutes ago, ItsTheMatrix said:

however I was wondering if there was any way I can convert this by buying a chassis with a motor for it? If so which part number would that be? If not I guess Ill have to buy the basic set.

 

This won't be feasible, as with multiple units the motorised car is almost always an intermediate car, even if you obtain the motorized chassis it won't fit into an end car (without destructive surgery).

 

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Another question, kato vs tomix? which is more accurate? 

 

That depends on the model.

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cteno4

Matrix,

 

as squid points out probably better to keep it as a desk toy and get a basic set to play with on the tracks.

 

kato vs Tomix is a running debate that involves a lot of variables and personal preferences. No clear choice in my book as I have a few hundred trains and both are great and each have their problem children. For some models where both make the same train some detailing, coupling etc May be different so you need to look at specific models to get a good comparison. Some folks tend to just stick to one brand, again there is a lot of personal preference here.

 

the good news is all the Japanese train manufacturers are really good quality and a reasonable prices (for the most part) so a good value compared to us and euro models, so it’s hard to go really wrong! Plus there are gobs and gobs of trains to choose from!

 

cheers

 

jeff

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ben_issacs

ItsTheMatrix.

Forget those first museum sets, they are only display models.

Get one of the Starter sets, oval of track, a train, usually an EMU (Electric Multiple Unit) or DMU (Diesel Multiple Unit), generally two or more cars, local or suburban train, and a controller and probably a transformer, and , importantly, a re-railer, a device to make it easier to put the cars on the tracks, essential for N gauge..

With this you can get an idea of how these models work, and they can form the basis of a larger layout if you decide to go that way.

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.

 

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paolo

As Bill says, starting with a Starter kit is a good idea.

I started a year or so ago like this, with the Shinkansen E5 starter kit from KATO.

You can play a bit with it and see if you like expanding to a real layout.

But be carful, it's like a virus (but a healthy one)... you think you can keep it small, maybe buy a couple of trains, nothing big... but that will go out of the window pretty quickly, and you'll end up with a huge layout taking up your living room, and KATO and Tomix boxes all over the place.

 

If you find you really like Japanese trains, I strongly suggest you try to take a trip to Japan. Seeing them in real life it's an experience worth every penny.

And you can get model trains from local shops at a much cheaper prices than what you'd pay back home.

 

Paolo

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Welshbloke

Where track is concerned, look at which you can get locally. Tomix offer greater variety but I can buy Kato track easily from two physical shops and a website.

 

Have a look at the starter sets, the EMU ones (including Shinkansen) tend to be a basic four car unit with additional expansion sets sold separately to bring the train up to full length. The first add-on is usually in one of those natty book shaped cases with spare slots for the cars from the basic set.

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cteno4

Yep the most important thing is to get a running train and some track to play with. You can do simple scenery bits and free pdf papercraft buildings to get started on the very cheap. Enjoy!
 

jeff

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nah00

Relevant to Kato vs. Tomix: if you see yourself wanting more than one of a certain train with Tomix the numbers aren't printed on the cars so you can number your trains differently. Granted this is a rivet counter thing and ymmv. Also Tomix sets generally don't have printed destination display boards but you buy them from Ginga Model or just use leftovers from Kato sets. Mechanically they are similar and I can't say I've had more trouble with one than the other. I do like Tomix's storage cases better though. 

Edited by nah00

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railsquid
18 minutes ago, nah00 said:

Relevant to Kato vs. Tomix: if you see yourself wanting more than one of a certain train with Tomix the numbers aren't printed on the cars so you can number your trains differently. Granted this is a rivet counter thing and ymmv. 

 

Also a pain to apply and get right...

 

Quote

 Also Tomix sets generally don't have printed destination display boards but you buy them from Ginga Model or just use leftovers from Kato sets.

 

Eh? Do you mean the little sheet of cut-out-and-attach front/side destination stickers? Which come with pretty much every Tomix set? (Though modern sets have swappable plastic inserts for the end destination display boards ).

 

Quote

I do like Tomix's storage cases better though. 

 

Any reason? The single car cases are large and bulky and the book cases have plastic clips which tend to degrade over time, while the Kato ones have a much more reliable "stud" clip.

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nah00

True, they can be a challenge (especially with ribbed cars or on a curved part) but I get a certain weird sense of accomplishment out of it. On that note though I do have to eventually get replacements for my 200 series Shinkansen, I didn't put them on right away and they didn't really transfer well. Maybe it's just the sets I've got but I only got front destination signs/inserts with Tomix, nothing for the sides except car numbers and accessibility stickers. I'm not a fan of their single car cases (still wondering what to do with the large tote I have of empty ones) but despite the plastic clips on the side I just like having a 'harder' case for trains. On a totally weird note I will say that cases for Kato set smell better, I swear they spray something in them at the factory. 

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railsquid
13 minutes ago, nah00 said:

Maybe it's just the sets I've got but I only got front destination signs/inserts with Tomix, nothing for the sides except car numbers and accessibility stickers.

 

Ah, apologies, after a quick rifle through the collection that does seem to be the case (hah) for newer sets, my thinking was skewed because pretty much the only set I've ever bothered to put the side destination signs on is an older 115 series which came with a full set.

 

I know whayt you mean about the Kato "smell" though :)

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ben_issacs

Folks,

I reckon that ItsThe Matrix shouldn't worry about such things as destination stickers yet, just get used to running your train set, there are much better things to do on a model railway than fiddling with tiny stickers, half of which one puts on crooked or upside down anyway.

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.

 

 

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ben_issacs

ItsTheMatrix,

With regard to your layout, you've got to have it in a permanent location, your own room, a shed, part of a garage, somewhere where it is relatively free from small children, pets, the cleaning lady etc.

As to size, perhaps six feet by three table would give you a possibility of a reasonable tail-chasing main line with a station and a couple of sidings for train storage, 

other group members will no doubt have better suggestions.

Wherever it is, if one side up against a wall, don't make it too wide, as you will have to get access to the tracks on the far side, and three feet is probably too much to reach across, an island layout is better if you have the space.

Do you have a near-by hobby shop who could perhaps put you in touch with another railway modeller , whilst the info. that you will get off this site is always very useful, to see a working layout close up and talk to its operator  is the best way to learn about the hobby.

There are lots of other things to consider, but stick with it and I hope you do become a dedicated N scale modeller.

Regards, 

Bill,

Melbourne.

 

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