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TRod

In train heaven now

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railsquid
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ben_issacs said:

TRod, 

A good collection, but the blue vans really should half-a-dozen or so more mates, they ran in block trains of fifteen or more carrying paper, it would be unlikely to see just a couple of them in an ordinary train, but, after all, it's your railway!

 

 

Thanks to the internet it's possible to find a protoype for pretty much everything 🙂

 

 

 

 

Edited by railsquid
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ben_issacs

Folks, 

Das Steinkopf's good shot of steam loco No.58654 shows an oddity of Japan's steam loco numbering system.

From before the First War, up till about the mid twenties, the IGR used a system of blocks of numbers for their locos, then after that time, the system used was an alpha-numerical system, i.e. C 11, D 51, C 62, etc.

But two classes of steam locos didn't come into this system, these were the 2-8-0 goods locos of the 9600 class and the 2-6-0 passenger locos of the 8620 class.

These two classes were the first steam locos fully designed by Japanese engineers, so they are of historical importance, and so retained their original numbers.

But, why 58654? in theory., it should be 86545.

For some reason, The IGR made what should be the last number of the classification be the first number, and the same applied to the 9600 class, where one could see 59611, instead of 96115!

Very confusing for the collector of locomotive numbers!

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

but 

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ben_issacs

Folks, 

Replying to railsquid's videos, the first one is of interest, the elec. loco isn't a JNR loco, it looks like a Gakunan Railway loco, the Gakunan Railway was the connection between the paper mill and the JNR  main line, this may be a demonstration train for rail fans.

 

This line ran, and may still do so, passenger trains, and may also run, or have run, container freights.

For the other video, it is likely that after the newsprint traffic ceased, the blue vans were used for ordinary goods traffic, so, yes, a couple of blue vans in a train could be o.k.!

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.  

 

 

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Pashina12
1 hour ago, ben_issacs said:

But, why 58654? in theory., it should be 86545.

For some reason, The IGR made what should be the last number of the classification be the first number, and the same applied to the 9600 class, where one could see 59611, instead of 96115!

 

 

Actually it's a lot simpler than that. The numbering of the 8620 class started at 8620, and went to 8699. The next locomotive was then numbered 18620, and then after reaching 18699, came 28620, etc etc. For the 9600 series it went 9600-9699, 19600-19699, etc etc. When the series "cycled" to a new ten-thousands number, the first number in the series was *always* the same as the first number of the class, e.g. 8620 class went to 18620 from 8699, not to 18600.

 

This system was replaced for locomotives with the introduction of the alphanumeric system. However, the same system was used for number freight cars, and for those, this system was used into the 1990s if not later.

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Pashina12

Also, the only steamer classes that was completely renumbered was the 9900 class, which became the D50 class, and the 8200 class, which became the C52 class. The C51 class started out as the 18900 series, but 8900-8999 were never reclassified/renumbered, only 18900-38988 were.

 

All the other classes built before the introduction of the alphanumeric system in 1928 retained their original numbers - these were the 960, 1000, 1060, 1070, 1150, 2700, 2900, 3500, 4100, 4110, 6250, 6700, 6750, 6760, 8500, 8620, 8700, 8800, 8850, 8900, 9020, 9550, 9580, 9600, 9750, 9800, and 9850.

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ben_issacs

Pashina 12, 

Thanks for your comments, I know the way that the 8620 and 9600 numbers went,  I wonder if the odd 8620 numbering was because this class didn't start at 8600, but at 8620, so there were always only eighty numbers in the number block, not one hundred.

This doesn't apply, though, to the 9600 class, they could well have gone straight from 9699 to 96100.

Regards, 

Bill,

Melbourne.

 

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ben_issacs

Folks, 

Further to Railsquids second video showing a blue WaMu van and a black ToRa open wagon in a train of empty container flats, these could be non-revenue service vehicles (track maintenance etc.) vehicles being transferred to another location.

It is likely that after the newsprint traffic ended, the blue WaMu's could have been used for other purposes for a while.

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.

 

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Pashina12
1 hour ago, ben_issacs said:

Pashina 12, 

Thanks for your comments, I know the way that the 8620 and 9600 numbers went,  I wonder if the odd 8620 numbering was because this class didn't start at 8600, but at 8620, so there were always only eighty numbers in the number block, not one hundred.

This doesn't apply, though, to the 9600 class, they could well have gone straight from 9699 to 96100.

Regards, 

Bill,

Melbourne.

 

They could have done, yeah - or they could have done like most North American railways and gone from 9699 to 9700 etc. But for whatever reason they decided to put the hundreds digit in the ten thousands place...

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TRod

I'm back. Been off line for a few months, shifted house and built a small shed.

Going to buy a small layout baseboard today, only about 4ft x 3ft. Get something started.

 

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TRod
On 4/27/2019 at 3:54 PM, ben_issacs said:

TRod, 

A good collection, but the blue vans really should half-a-dozen or so more mates, they ran in block trains of fifteen or more carrying paper, it would be unlikely to see just a couple of them in an ordinary train, but, after all, it's your railway!

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.

Thanks Bill, good to find out what carried what. Maybe a few more cars and a papermill then.

 

I very carefree with my layouts, I'll just run whatever, as long as there's something moving, I'm happy.

On 4/27/2019 at 3:54 PM, ben_issacs said:

 

 

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TRod
On 1/8/2019 at 2:46 PM, TRod said:

At Hakata station seeing all the cruise trains is like WOW!

I don’t know all their names of by heart but l might be going on the fancy green one tomorrow morning before Shinkansen back to Osaka.

82957101-80D0-462F-91AF-34656C3B34D1.jpeg

Can anyone tell me which train this is please. Like it's name to look for when trying to book a trip.

Only got one week in Japan and it will be end of January. 

Hmmm, may sneak a trip to Bali to go surfing before then.

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Gryphr

It's a 787 series of JR Kyushu. According to Wikipedia (as of March 2018) and JR Kyushus website it operates all services of the Limited Express Ariake, some services of Kirameki, Kamome, Midori, Nichirin, Nichirin Seagaia, Hyuga, Kirishima, Kaio and apparently some regular trains on the Miyazaki Airport line and on a section of the Nippo Main Line. I'm not sure if there is a publicly available timetable that shows exactly which service uses which type of train.

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katoftw

Go to 787 section of the JR Kyushu website for timetabling.

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TRod
Posted (edited)

Thanks gents.

Planning on a mid to late January 2 week trip based at mother-in-laws in Osaka.

Will concentrate on one really good 2 or 3 night train focused trip, so l should get a couple of nice trains in in those few days, the rest will be less trains, more culture and shopping.

Edited by TRod
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