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Osaka Metro plans massive facelift, 55-floor station building

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Socimi

I rather dislike all of these new designs.

 

Especially the rebuild project for Shinsaibashi staton, with it's cacophony of colors.

 

Yes, today's one is rather plain, but i think it's quite nice with the chandelier-like lights hanging down from the celling.

 

https://matome.naver.jp/odai/2144102920952287801/2144232621467532803

 

I think it should be better to preserve or rather restore it to it's very original style, as it's an historic station (it opened in 1933, along the first section of the Midosuji line).

 

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chadbag

The "Osaka of the Near Future" with its "flying saucer" looking thing looks like the 1960s (or late 1950s) to me.

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Sacto1985

Speaking of Osaka, I wonder is Hankyu still considering rebuilding Jūsō Station, unless they're really tied up with the massive construction project at Awaji Station.

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trainsforever8

The exciting part about this is to see if other railways in the Osaka region will start doing updates in anticipation for the world expo

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Socimi
On 12/28/2018 at 1:59 PM, trainsforever8 said:

The exciting part about this is to see if other railways in the Osaka region will start doing updates in anticipation for the world expo

 

Judging by current JR East's preparation for the olympics and by looking back at the 1970 Osaka Expo'70, this is what i think will be done:

 

JR West will get rid of all of the JNR-designed stock still in operation by placing a massive order for a new version of the 227 series (229 series?)  that will replace the 103, 113, 115, 117, 123 and 105 series (and probably also the 205 series) and by speeding up the delivery of the 323 series (replacing the refurbished 201 series on the Osaka Loop Line and on the Yamatoji/Nara lines).

The 207 and 211 series will be moved away from mainline (Tokaido, Fukuchiyama...) duties to the rural lines, taking the place of the JNR stock. Their place taken in turn, by said new 229? series. The 381 series will also be replaced (probably by a new batch of 287 series).

For the 20Kv AC EMUs, the 413, 415, 455 and 457 series will be replaced by either a new batch of the 521 series or by an entirely new build (523 series?).

Expect a lot of new tourist trains.

 

Osaka Municipal Subway Osaka Metro , will play the most important part in connecting the Expo, being located on Yumeshima Island, future terminus of Line No.4 (Chuo Line).

They will wipe out all of the pre-2000 stock such as the 10 series (1979 - Line No.1 - Midosuji Line) and 20 series (1984 - Line No.4, it was the first train in Japan on regular service to use a VVVF inverter control).

The New 20 series, wich is the backbone of all 5 third rail-powered lines of Osaka Subway, running on Line No.1 (Midosuji Line), Line No.2 (Tanimachi Line), Line No.3 (Yotsubashi Line), Line No.4 (Chuo Line) and Line No.5 (Sennichimae Line) will be either fully refurbished or more probably replaced altogheter.

The 66 series of Line No.6 (Sakaisuji Line) will also be probably replaced.

 

The Japantimes mentioned in an article, an order for 180 new cars, wich is the exact number of the New 20 series cars in service on the Midosuji Line.

 

Inter-running private companies such as Kitakyu (Kita-Osaka Kyuko, a subsidiary of Hankyu, inter-running on the Midosuji Line) will erase it's awersome 8000 series, and Kintetsu (inter-running on the Chuo Line via the Kintetsu Keihanna Line) will replace it's 7000 and 7020 with a new type of EMU.

 

Hankyu is in a good situation, compared to the others. The only probable change that will be made is the replacement of the 6000 series (1976) by a new type of stock, and knowing Hankyu, it will keep it's elegant and serious look and colouring, rather than the "flashy and cool" new appearance of the other companies (many of wich are it's competitors). 

 

Keihan, will carry out a massive replacement of rolling stock to eliminate anything older than 1990, in this case the 1000 series (1977), 2200 series (1964), 2400 series (1969), 2600 series (1978), 5000 series (1970), 6000 series (1983) and 7000 series (1990). Probably also the Limited Express 8000 series (1989).

 

Nankai (including it's subsidiary Semboku Rapid Railway) similarily, will erase all of the pre-1990 stock such as the 6000 series and 9000 series. The 50000 series Rap:t will probably be refurbished, as they're a strong commercial identity of Nankai.

 

Plus there's to consides also changes by nearby railway companies in Kyoto, Kobe, Wakayama ...

 

 

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katoftw

Nara line will get all the 4 car 223 and 225 series hand me downs, as I'd assume the 323 series will come in 4 car at some point.

 

But who knows?  The 225s, 227 Red and Green and the 323 are so closely related, that anything is possible.

Edited by katoftw

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Sacto1985

I think right now JR West is negotiating with Kinki Sharyo and Kawasaki for a possible GIGANTIC buy of updated 227 Series trains to essentially replace all the 103, 105, 113, 115 and 117 Series train sets in JR West service. I can see the 207 and 211 Series trains turned into two-car train sets for operations on the Bantan, Hakubi, Onoda and Ube lines.

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trainsforever8

Also, in the illustrations, has anybody noticed the interesting design of the trains used on the Chuo Line? The front reminds me of European-style commuter trains somehow (like the Flirts or Kiss). 

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Socimi
22 hours ago, trainsforever8 said:

Also, in the illustrations, has anybody noticed the interesting design of the trains used on the Chuo Line? The front reminds me of European-style commuter trains somehow (like the Flirts or Kiss). 

 

They probably are some kind of placeholder.

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trainsforever8

I'm super excited to see the railway developments in Osaka due to the Expo. Makes me wonder if the extension of the Hokkaido Shinkansen to Sapporo would've been accelerated if they happened to win the bid for the next winter Olympics. 

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