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tavora

Wall Framed Layout

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cteno4

Yep this is right up a cabinet maker’s alley and uber fast to put together in a good shop, so they can spend a day on it and make a profit where as a carpenter usually working on site on some “woodworking” approach might have a hard time to do it efficiently and thus will grouse... really is a cabinet shop job.

 

jeff

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TRod

And after it's all done and finished you can put a great big scenic picture of your favorite train on the underside so when it's folded away you have a decorative talking point.

Love the idea, think l might do the same as my 2400 x 1220 set up will be in my shed or garage so this will keep the dust of my set and me outside away from the boss lady.

The gas shocks is a great idea for those moments when you just stuff up. Would save thousands in replacing broken bits.

Good luck, watching on with interest.

 

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tavora
On 1/4/2019 at 8:42 PM, cteno4 said:

"might keep slowly asking around about a carpenter. This could actually be a cabinet maker as it’s really the same construction. "

 

On 1/4/2019 at 11:31 PM, gavino200 said:

" But when I switched to calling "cabinet makers" I found lots of places that were super keen to help, and if anything they regularly undercharge me. Just a thought."

 

Ok, that makes sense. It's worth to try it and see if the "cabinet maker" doesn't get "spooked 👻with the project.  😁

Thanks guys

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tavora
On 1/5/2019 at 1:42 PM, TRod said:

And after it's all done and finished you can put a great big scenic picture of your favorite train on the underside so when it's folded away you have a decorative talking point.

Love the idea, think l might do the same as my 2400 x 1220 set up will be in my shed or garage so this will keep the dust of my set and me outside away from the boss lady.

The gas shocks is a great idea for those moments when you just stuff up. Would save thousands in replacing broken bits.

Good luck, watching on with interest.

 

 

I didn't thought about a big scenic picture but two framed classic "art deco" train posters. I've some drawings made with a 3D modelling program, which are part of the folder project that I meant to show to the "carpenters", "cabinet makers" to give them the idea of what I have in mind. Just to make it easier to swap ideas of what might work or not.

I guess I've never got the time to post them in the forum. Ohh well.

 

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tavora
Posted (edited)

After a lot of thought and help from this forum, I ended up with this 3D sketches for the wall framed layout.

Seems that I lost some picture quality when resizing the picture, sorry about that and for the furniture representation. 😉

http://www.jnsforum.com/community/gallery/image/6578-proj01jpg/

 

Edited by tavora
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cteno4

Tavora,

 

looks good! Really is just a big, shallow cabinet turned on end! A good cabinet shop should be able to do this easily. Biggest issue will be doing train table to keep it thin. A good lap jointed waffle of 12mm Baltic birch ply cross pieces on a 25cm cm grid (lots of holes in all the grid cross pieces to lighten and allow for wiring) should give a good structure. You could probably get it done to like 4cm thick and top with 5 or 6mm ply front and back. Probably want the back/bottom to unbolt or hinge off to do wiring easy, but be the big wall surface when layout is raised. Frame on Wall is basically a big cabinet bolted to the wall. Just some engineering for hinge and any pneumatic pistons if you use those to aid raising/lowering. Legs could hinge onto the layout but then they will hang on the wall. I’ve done legs for temp fold down futon bed and also a table by just doing an X of two slats of ply with a big lap joint so the slide into each other and create a leg with a cross section of an X. They spare stable enough to hold themselves upright during set up and a bit more cross section for support and stability than a thin leg. Pull apart and they are easy pieces to store.

 

cheers,

 

jeff

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tavora

Thanks.

I agree with you Jeff, keep it light is the main goal. The pneumatic pistons are still a question mark for me, once they will take inside space. Hope I will not need them.

The legs hinged onto the layout will have embedded magnets to hold them in place avoiding any hanging. However the cross section X legs is a good idea, specially because of all the bottom access for the wiring and weight. The project looks good but it's not perfect or ideal in some points for all the track and wiring installation. Maybe if done in stages with the cross legs and when finish maybe then and only then accomplish the final look of the project.  

 

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cteno4

Tavora,

 

Keeping things light, stiff, and thin is the key. This is where a good cabinet maker can get cleaver and do tight work. Your waffle may do at 6 or 9mm ply to save weight. The interior waffle is the key to lock it into a nice flat and stiff form. Using tight edge cross lap joints (like a wine case inserts) can make an uber rigid waffle once locked into a strong frame and top piece with glue.locking the internal grid into the frame with dado joints will help make it all tight.

 

Good thought, do without hinged legs and use temp x legs and then see how the hinged legs on the wall look to you. The hinged legs will make things stick out a bit further.

 

i agree that the pneumatic pistons will be a bit fiddly to engineer in and take some space up. You may not need it as I doubt this will be super heavy to lift push up in place. Could have a simple pully you do up to the top of the wall cabinet to aid in pulling up soothly. It sound just clip on/off just for open/close.

 

jeff

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tavora

After all the tribulations and miss fortunes I've gone through the present year, I have finally found the motivation to get my project out of the ground. 

Due to my partner opinion being against the wall baseboard, which I fully understand, once we might have to move house in the future. The project has changed slightly  🤔from a wall permanent feature to a more movable table framed baseboard. 🤨 

 

Drawings will follow soon...

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tavora
Posted (edited)

After scraping the wall baseboard, which was the ideal solution for the room

 

01.png

 

I had to go back to the drawing table and figure out how to fit the new project into a fully furnished room, with no extra storage space available to put anything else. 🙄

So I end up with this...

 02.png   03.png 04.png

Yes, underneath it's a pulling out bed, might not be the best solution but I think it will work. 😉

 

Edited by tavora

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tavora

After so many attempts frustrating unanswered requests for a quote to get someone to built my table/baseboard, I was left with only one quote of £1500🤯. My initial idea was to spend no more than £500 and that's pushing it.

Well, unbeaten I decided to look out of the box. Start looking around for workbenches, crazy? Maybe.🙄

After going through a lot of the offers online I bumped into a heavy duty workbench that had more or less the measurements intended. Actually had more than less but workable and like Jeff suggested before its better to have more space than not.

This is what I’ve got, it works perfect and the bed slots underneath it. Had a few minor alterations to the original, but nothing that I couldn’t do myself. The worst part was the weight of each piece that didn’t do any good to my old back injury. I am paying the price now with acute pain (electric shocks) through my spine each time I make any bending down, sitting or any other sudden movements.

 

The frame (38mm x 89mm) and legs (45mm x 145mm) is made of softwood timber. The baseboard top (2400mm x 1220mm) is made of 18mm MDF ply sheet (??? I think they mean just MDF), I would had preferred ply for the top but that was the compromise. It’s built like a tank, sturdy and if you think about moving it, well think again.

Overall I’m quite happy with it and worth every penny, £325 delivered to the door instead of £1500.

My only concern is if I should reinforce the frame? Underneath the 18mm MDF baseboard (2400mm x 1220mm) at the middle of it (1200mm) I only have one wood piece (35mm x 60mm) supporting it. Is this enough to avoid any warping? Being a heavy duty workbench I shouldn’t worry too much and just start to enjoy the next step.

 

Now let the fun begin…

 

01.png

02.png

Edited by tavora
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cteno4

Wow! That’s a good find to solve the situation! Yeah getting custom stuff like this done can be horridly expensive, glad you found an affordable option. Great the spare bed just fits nicely.

 

18mm mdf is pretty tough stuff but it can sag some with time. I’m kind of surprised with a work bench of that size they didn’t do more bracing under it as you are like to bash on the top of the bench and place heavy things on them for a while. Could not hurt running a couple of 18x70mm cross pieces in the center of each side, but does mean dragging it out from the wall to install them unless you use some L brackets to mount them (and that’s a bit of upside down on your back). Best to roll on a coat of exterior flat latex paint to the top so that you seal it from moisture well for applying scenery later.

 

was this a company that makes these or someone’s unused one they built. If it’s a company then I expect they have enough experience with these to trust the 18mm mdf they use. You won’t be putting much of any weight on it except yourself to reach to the back. Speaking of the back could you think of putting it on wheels to easily pull from the wall? Reaching back 1.2m is going to require you to use a stool and one hand down on the layout. I have long arms and 1.2m would be tough for me to reach to the back let alone do any sustained work there. Other option are a using those appliance slides that are a disc of hdpe or other uh wow plastic that slides well (better than dragging the bench supports on the floor).

 

glad you got going here on the layout!

 

cheers

 

jeff

 

 

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tavora

This was made by a company that makes outdoor (garden), workshop and industry wooden furniture. For a smaller version of this workbench (not so sturdy) they claim that it is able to support 850kg. God knows how much this one could take.💪

As I mentioned before I had to make some changes to it, specially the bottom shelf which I had to eliminate. I cut the bottom shelve to the same height of the workbench and used it to create a back drop which has been screwed to the back of the workbench making it more sturdy (as if it needed) 😊. The excess from that cut I used to create shelves to put in a cupboard elsewhere in the house. No waist here. ♻️

 

17 hours ago, cteno4 said:

 

18mm mdf is pretty tough stuff but it can sag some with time. I’m kind of surprised with a work bench of that size they didn’t do more bracing under it as you are like to bash on the top of the bench and place heavy things on them for a while. Could not hurt running a couple of 18x70mm cross pieces in the center of each side, but does mean dragging it out from the wall to install them unless you use some L brackets to mount them (and that’s a bit of upside down on your back). Best to roll on a coat of exterior flat latex paint to the top so that you seal it from moisture well for applying scenery later.

 

 

 

 

I agree Jeff, at this point I think the only way (due to the heavy weight) is to use some L brackets to mount them on the wall side even if that means taking risks with my back. No pain, no gain. 

 

The wheels were optional but after speaking to them directly and been told that the maximum height with or without wheels would be 900mm, I decided without. Just because I could get them afterwards if needed and at the same time gain some extra height.

 

Reaching back 1.2m is not an issue for me, once I'm tall and have long arms. That said, this is true when my back isn't playing with me, which is not the case now.

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