Jump to content
Japanese Modelling & Japan Rail Enthusiasts Forum

Recommended Posts

My son has been playing with Lego trains for a while. They're pretty nifty. The motor is fast and they're remote control. While n-scale is something we do together, LEGO (and HO scale) are completely his own thing

 

We're in the US. I was wondering if anyone knows if LEGO release trains in Japan or other countries that are different to what we have here? Thanks.

 

flWc7u4.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ahh.. Lego trains... brings back memories... I used to have quite a large fleet but they had to make way due to space... it takes a tremendous amount of space to run them (like what you have set up above) thus I had to let them go...

 

I recall the crown jewels being the BNSF and the Santa Fe.... along with the newer Emerald nights....

 

Not that I know off, but there doesn't seem to be any exclusive Lego Japan train for the Japanese market, but there are exclusive airline only sets that are only sold on board planes...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's interesting. Lego doesn't seem to be giving the trains specific identities anymore. They're all slightly generic looking and have the same logo - a circle with two arrows. My son decides what they are and gives them new identities anyway.

 

This one is an ICE

 

lvo3Uek.jpg

 

 

Japanese freight (left) and US freight (right)

 

HD1rtdM.jpg

 

 

Christmas train - motor wasn't included and is currently eagerly awaited in the mail.

 

4n3PODh.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Lego tries to keep some generic branding to avoid having to pay for licensing.  I had the full Super Chief, BNSF diesels and container trains as well as a few others, but I recently sold them pay for more N scale stock.  I actually still have the Lego train maintenance shed if you are interested gavino.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Kiha66 said:

I think Lego tries to keep some generic branding to avoid having to pay for licensing.  I had the full Super Chief, BNSF diesels and container trains as well as a few others, but I recently sold them pay for more N scale stock.  I actually still have the Lego train maintenance shed if you are interested gavino.

 

Absolutely!! I'll PM you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually many old 1970-1980ies sets had proper logos and you could easily identify the actual models. (BR80, TEE, V100, etc.)

 

Then in the 1990ies, came the properly branded american sets and some more european sets, like the austrian and swiss crocodiles. There were some really bad fantasy trains too.

 

The 2000s and the RC era bought the first ICE and some more german sets.

 

The PF era (now) has brought a split between the train line to collectors sets aimed more at adults, like the Tornado, Maersk and TGV sets (they come unmotored but upgradable) and more kids oriented starter sets and a few themed fantasy sets. The starter sets are unbranded but the trains are recognisable in them.

 

For ICE sets, we have two types, the RC era ICE3 and the new ICE4. With a bit of digging you can find the CSX SD40 locomotive the blue one is modelled after and the red one is a european one (a Vossloch) like the yellow one before (a Dispolok EuroSprinter).

 

Anyway, these are kids sets, so not as detailed as the collector sets like the TGV (which you have to buy at least two for a short but complete train).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hello Gavin

 

With LEGO Trains they are no longer a standalone theme and have been merged into LEGO City, these days you are likely to see about 3 train sets available in that theme over a 3 year cycle, there may also be another one added roughly every 2-3 years through the Creator Expert range which the Emerald Night, Maersk, Horizon Express and the Winter Village Train are from. For LEGO trains these days are seen more as a supplementary to the City range and it's rare to have additional sets to go with them such as stations and other sets as they have tended to be slow movers, the last train station being a prime example. Contrary to LEGO's attitude to the Trains theme there is a sizable LEGO Train community worldwide, for LEGO though it is difficult as just like regular model railways people have wide and varied tastes and most people build their own trains inspired by or based on those in real life. I was very active in the LEGO train community for about 12 years but after my first trip to Japan in 2015 I went back to traditional model railways, I got bitten by the N Scale bug when I was over there thanks to seeing a MicroAce Keihan Keishin 800 Series in Tokyu Hands in Shibuya, after that I fell down a very slippery slope. I also got back into modelling GWR in OO Scale about a year ago, I had modelled that for nearly 20 years prior to getting involved with LEGO trains.

 

Here is a link to my Flickr albums so you can see my LEGO Train collection, I also have heaps of photos in my photostream that are not in my albums.   https://www.flickr.com/photos/david_stannard/albums

Edited by Das Steinkopf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woo, other Lego train people!

Someone mentioned the SantaFe stuff.

My pride is an F7 that I got years ago as a child. It is one if three sets that were never rebuilt/modified and one two sets that never came apart once assembled. The dozen other cars have been reassembled many times, although they'll probably not look like their lego-designed selves much longer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×