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Gavino200's Layout phase II - Modeling

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14 minutes ago, Kiha66 said:

What grade did you use for the incline? Maybe using the add on set to halve the grade would help, although I agree the trains run best on level track.  I'm excited to see what you come up with, its been fun watching the layout progress!  

 

Thanks Kiha. Yes, I have the add-on set. Honestly it's not terrible. Many trains can handle it fine. I've added extra motor cars to some trains. Quite a few trains struggle a small amount. This isn't a huge deal but I find it sort of ruins the "Illusion". Some small engines just can't make it and are relegated to shunting. It's a minor problem that just bugs me a bit over time. But it does bug me enough that I'm certain that if I were to do it over, I would used a varied ground level illusion, rather than inclined/declined tracks. It's a pity because low foreground/ high background makes a nice effect. 

 

There will be lots more progress. I'm just beginning to really understand this stuff. 

Edited by gavino200

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10 hours ago, gavino200 said:

This is my first attempt at Anyrail. I'm going to split the overall train project into two parts. 

1. Keep working on the layout until I'm happy with it.

2. Start learning to model with T-trak. 

 

This is the current layout board. I'm seriously thinking about redoing or extending it.

 

zVV7T6m.jpg

 

Gavino,

 

Setup up Anyrail

 

Go to settings tab,

 

set Size to 12.   This means each block is 12".

Then set the Length and width to the exact length of your room.

This will give you the exact spacing for the gray area that represents your layout.

Now your tracks will lay to scale.

 

I'm not sure what your direction is but I would convert your layout to NTrak, Woodland Scenics Mod-U-Rail or seivers bench work. 

 

Go to Sievers first as its easier to follow.  Layout your room using their cutout system. The gray area is called the bench work. 

Then try woodland scenic and NTrak. Which ever bench work your use it will dictate the shape of the gray area. This will not change. 

Then you will layout your track withing that area or layout your track and create the bench work that outlines the rail.

 

http://www.ntrak.org/documents/Manual.pdf    pg 21

https://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/category/ModURailSystem

https://www.sieversbenchwork.com/modulelayout.html

 

 

Inobu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, inobu said:

 

Gavino,

 

Setup up Anyrail

 

Go to settings tab,

 

set Size to 12.   This means each block is 12".

Then set the Length and width to the exact length of your room.

This will give you the exact spacing for the gray area that represents your layout.

Now your tracks will lay to scale.

 

I'm not sure what your direction is but I would convert your layout to NTrak, Woodland Scenics Mod-U-Rail or seivers bench work. 

 

Go to Sievers first as its easier to follow.  Layout your room using their cutout system. The gray area is called the bench work. 

Then try woodland scenic and NTrak. Which ever bench work your use it will dictate the shape of the gray area. This will not change. 

Then you will layout your track withing that area or layout your track and create the bench work that outlines the rail.

 

http://www.ntrak.org/documents/Manual.pdf    pg 21

https://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/category/ModURailSystem

https://www.sieversbenchwork.com/modulelayout.html

 

 

Inobu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great timing Inobu. I'm working on Anyrail right now. Thanks !!

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31 minutes ago, inobu said:

 

Gavino,

 

Setup up Anyrail

 

Go to settings tab,

 

set Size to 12.   This means each block is 12".

Then set the Length and width to the exact length of your room.

This will give you the exact spacing for the gray area that represents your layout.

Now your tracks will lay to scale.

 

I'm not sure what your direction is but I would convert your layout to NTrak, Woodland Scenics Mod-U-Rail or seivers bench work. 

 

Go to Sievers first as its easier to follow.  Layout your room using their cutout system. The gray area is called the bench work. 

Then try woodland scenic and NTrak. Which ever bench work your use it will dictate the shape of the gray area. This will not change. 

Then you will layout your track withing that area or layout your track and create the bench work that outlines the rail.

 

http://www.ntrak.org/documents/Manual.pdf    pg 21

https://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/category/ModURailSystem

https://www.sieversbenchwork.com/modulelayout.html

 

 

Inobu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's already a big help. One foot squares, and the layout is now in my trainroom. I still need to finetune the dimensions and find out how to drag it to the far left corner of the room.

 

Not sure what you mean by the following "I'm not sure what your direction is but I would convert your layout to NTrak, Woodland Scenics Mod-U-Rail or seivers bench work."

 

But I'm working on it anyway. 

 

bwyyj9K.png

Edited by gavino200

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I'm not sure which direction you are going meaning your plans. complete tear down or partial rework or modify. This goes back to our conversation of expecting to build it twice.

 

Focus on the bench work for now. I've used the Sievers and its saves time on the prebuild. You will either pay in time or money. 

 

Print out their PDF template and use it to create the bench work. I believe their templates are 3/4"=1 foot.

Using your Anyrail image. You will need to draw out grid making each block 3/4". Then use the template to create the gray area representing your bench work. 

 

From there you can create a material list and price it.

Its a good exercise that will give you a lot of insight.

 

Inobu

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks Inobu! You rock!

 

I'm not sure either about the direction. I'm sort of at a crossroads. But I'll let you know.

 

At very least the near end module and the corner need to be replaced or modified. Those were poorly calculated. The width of the two joining bridge sections was chosen so that the little guy could stand on a chair and reach the far track if he leans one hand on the board. But they're painfully narrow. It's fine for play, but for modeling it's highly suboptimal. 

 

I'm loving Anyrail so far. 

 

uBTdunJ.png

Edited by gavino200

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Gavin, 

 

smart to always think access. One help can be to have some lift off scenery sections like you were talking about with the city and tunnel. Do the main work on the table with full access and then plunk on the layout. There is the tradeoff in size with these as bigger ones need heavier bases and engineering and harder to lift on and off. Smaller ones of course can mean more seams to deal with. Even short sections of hill side and such can be made off the layout then set in place and faired in either permanently or loosely.

 

keep fiddling. You can quickly mock up sections with the track you have and use some craft paper or cardboard on the floor to layout proposed bench shapes and sizes. Good to go back and forth from software to real track.

 

i don’t think your thin sections are an issue in too small a space so long as you don’t pile it full of too much track. Again layouts are all about tradeoffs. 2’ deep can do a very nice scene and actually lets you focus it more. Deeper scenes can be harder to focus attention and give a nice visual path thru the layout. Deep scenes can be great, just a lot more challenging to make them work well and harder to work on.

 

having lots of train storage on the layout can be a real challenge as it takes up space quickly. On the JRM layouts we have tried to keep it to sidings and passing sidings so we can swap out a few trains then the big yard off layout. This helps the two from mashing each other as good storage yards take up a lot of space and layouts usually cramp yards built within layout and take up a lot of scenery room. Noodle on the helix idea and some form of underlayout storage if you want to have a lot of trains that are on the tracks at all times.

 

one concept can be to just have a single track on a stick like a meter long that can hold a 6-8 car train. These can be put on a rack on the wall and individual ones the placed onto a slot on the edge of the layout to run trains on and off of them. It’s a little tricky innthe move but I experimented with it and it was not all that hairy. The upside is very little room needed and uber simple construction. Down side is don’t drop the train! I have been meaning to play with some system to put a half shell over the stick to contain the train better during transfer for safety. Can’t go completely around if you want wall rack storage/case, but halfway may be enough.

 

one last thought is thinking sectional on your layout. Basically take the layout you come up with and break it into 3-4’ sections. Then build it so it can break it apart at the joints to get better access when needed. Sections ans rest on legs, wall mounted racks, or rollaround shelving or cabinets for ease of moving around. Have the layout sections not attached to the supports so you can tip them up to work on wiring and such under the layout. Your J design could do this well. Of course there will be the joints to cover up but you can get cleaver with scenery to help with this. If the scene is good also folks don’t even notice the joints. Folks miss them all time on the JRM layout asking how we got it in there! The big upside is if you ever move the layout can be moved as well and not have to be torn out. Murphre’s Law of layouts is if you build a built in layout you will move!

 

anyhow just ideas to knoodle on for you. Take your time, you have something functional you are enjoying and you have things you can add to it and experiment with that can go into layout 2.0 so all good investments.

 

cheers

 

jeff

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Thanks Jeff. I did a fair bit of thinking last night on this, while running my Eva and Maranouchi, both of which take the incline perfectly. I really do enjoy this layout, and honestly, it's probably better than I deserve to have - you know, kids out there with zero toys etc. 

 

Also, I've been looking at a lot of inspirational layouts lately for ideas. That's a double edged sword. My ideas are way ahead of my skill level. It's easy to get obsessive wanting ever cooler N-scale stuff. but hopefully I have many years to do this.

 

I think I'll probably rebuild. But I have a lot to learn from this layout before I do - even if it doesn't look quite right. I'm going to work on planning a 2.0 and think it through for maybe a year. Anyrail is big help. And yes I want to think more modular. My bench work is modular but the foamboard and layout isn't. I figured I would just cut the foam if I had to move. I didn't think about taking out modules to work on.

 

In the meantime, I'm going to try things out on this layout. I'm going to actually do the nutty visible C-shaped tunnel. I have a feeling it will look dumb and I won't use it. But it'll work great as a class in "foam sculpting 101".

 

I may also, later experiment with elevating the mainline. I did some of that last night on Anyrail, and remembered the horrors of Kato double viaduct limitatons. So I'd want to source some non super-elevated viaduct first and I'd keen the station section as is, just elevated on foam. 

 

In any case, I'm plodding on with the tunnel project, on the replica layout, mainly as a learning exercise. Who knows, I might even like the result.

 

Practice board set up in my workroom.

 

546MGB3.jpg

 

Btw I found our very first two layouts while looking for the folding table.

 

bMFGrHN.jpg

 

 

Edited by gavino200

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Over the last five years I ve used various materials for base boards.I think I ve found a combination that I m going to use on. The new layout.It s what I ve used on the tram layout,layered 25mm thick sheets of polystyrene,5mm thick foam board then 5mm thick laminate floor foam underlay.I found it strong and easy to work with and it’s extremely light,it s also unaffected by the change in temperature in the shed,so for me it’s perfect. I m going to mock a piece up this week and leave it in the shed and see what happens over the coming weeks.using two pieces of polystyrene,one layer each of the card and foam underlay is the exact same height as the track support piers.

the only down side is the foamcard bends when it gats wet with paint or glue so I’ll be using double sided tape to fix them together.

i ll post a pick once it’s done.

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1 hour ago, Pauljag900 said:

Over the last five years I ve used various materials for base boards.I think I ve found a combination that I m going to use on. The new layout.It s what I ve used on the tram layout,layered 25mm thick sheets of polystyrene,5mm thick foam board then 5mm thick laminate floor foam underlay.I found it strong and easy to work with and it’s extremely light,it s also unaffected by the change in temperature in the shed,so for me it’s perfect. I m going to mock a piece up this week and leave it in the shed and see what happens over the coming weeks.using two pieces of polystyrene,one layer each of the card and foam underlay is the exact same height as the track support piers.

the only down side is the foamcard bends when it gats wet with paint or glue so I’ll be using double sided tape to fix them together.

i ll post a pick once it’s done.

 

Paul, that's at least one thing I don't have to worry about. I've done my time in the shed. As a kid, I had my OO gauge outside. I still remember the smell of the oil furnace while I played. This time round it's all strictly indoor. The room is technically in the basement. But it's a fully finished room, and we installed heated tiles when we moved in. It also doubles as an exercise room, a music room (I play my trumpet there so it doesn't bother everyone) and a reading room (nice and quiet down there). I strongly recommend you bring the trains inside. You won't regret it.

Edited by gavino200

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