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dmustu

Adding Parts

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Hello,

 

After a recent house move I now have space to do some modelling. I have finally got round to start fitting the detailing parts that come with the models, some are quite easy to fit and some not!

 

So, before losing any more bits into the abyss otherwise known as carpet, do any of you have any tips or advice for fitting these parts, and any recommended tools for the job?

 

I have some tools but an struggling with some parts, would rubber tipped tweezers be useful,or not worth it?

 

Many Thanks, Stuart.

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My number one suggestion is patience. It took me over an hour to attach the parts to two Hoki800s the other night. Sometimes it's not about what tools you have or don't have - just parts that are really hard to fit.

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I agree patience!

 

for fine stuff I've not used rubberized tweezers much, only for larger parts where I don't want to leave marks. Trying to get tiny parts onto rubberized tweezer tips can be tough, but easy to try and see how it works for you. You can make your own by dipping the tips of some inexpensive tweezers into handle rubber or softer glues. 

 

a good pair of sharp pointed tweezers does the trick for me most all the time. Tough thing with small parts in tweezers you need to hold your hand steady with just enough pressure, too much and it can scissor or flip out the part and too little and it drops out! So one thing is to rest your hands between parts. 

 

For very inexpensive but good, sharp tweezers, the ebay acne tweezers work well. Nice very fine sharp tweezers are expensive but you can ruin the tips easily, so for most small parts I find these work great and cheap enough to have a few sets so always one at hand and if you drop them and bung the tip no big deal. These sets also have them in three shapes which is handy depending on the item you are going at.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-pcs-set-Acne-Needle-Tweezers-Blackhead-Pimples-Removal-Pointed-Bend-Gib-SY/382207723114?epid=13007639994&hash=item58fd5b066a:g:abMAAOSwCY9Zn5Af

 

another really handy tool are dental files. These are very fine tapered files to help open holes up, just gently twirl them in a hole till the part fits just right. Trying to cram a small part stub into too tight a hole is the usual way that parts end up going sproing and flying across the room.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-Pack-Dental-Niti-K-File-21mm-15-40-Hand-Use-files-Endodontic-Instruments/112649889259?epid=3002559135&hash=item1a3a74e5eb:g:FCgAAOSw5dlaEpQ~

 

If you are having issues picking up tiny pieces, these was gem stickers help a lot to grab the part to pick off with tweezers.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/3pcs-set-Up-Pen-Set-Nail-Dotting-Pencil-Rhinestones-Picker-Manicure-Tools/172726589960?hash=item28374e9a08:g:6E8AAOSwCmZZPhBO

 

the dish is great to corral small parts. These triangle dishes are also handy to sort tiny parts.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/8pcs-Container-Holder-Triangle-Phone-Craft-Nail-Art-Rhinestones-Gems/132379753297?hash=item1ed272bb51:g:1m8AAOSw4CFYrTDG

 

once the part is in place it's usually better to apply the cement from the inside of the shell thru the bottom of the hole. If the hole does not go all the way thru with a micro drill and pin vise. Putting the glue on the inside keeps glue from squishing out around the base of your part as well as making it easier to remove the part if you want to by just gently drilling out the glue thru the hole in the bottom and part can usually come out with some of the stub still on it and the hole clean.

 

these are very handy to apply tiny bits of glue. They work better with ca glue than toothpicks. I've moved to using regular thick model cement for these little parts as it is more forgiving if you need to remove a part. If I do use ca glue I use the thick stuff. Ca glue inside shells can cause issues wirh crazing or fogging on the clear plastics from the fumes.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/50PC-Disposable-Eyeliner-Brush-Eyeshadow-Applicator-Eyes-Makeup-Cosmetic-Tool-AF/272947421551?hash=item3f8cef216f:g:0rMAAOSwYc5aE8wn

 

last it's good practice to lay down a piece of cloth on the work surface and also one on your lap to catch small parts if the do fly or fall. I use black velour, just picked up remnants in the dollar bin at the fabric store. The fuzz helps keep parts from bouncing and easier to see most parts on it (white works as well). Bibs and aprons work, but are more of a pain and need to get hooked to the work bench. I find the simpler and easier the safety solution the more likely you are to use it more of the time!

 

good luck, its mostly practice and patience. Test fit, adjust, etc before you whip out the glue! Don't have a cup of coffee just before diving in! Take a rest now and then and shake out your hands.

 

jeff

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To locate missing parts, a nice strong LED torch comes in very handy, as even if they throw only a small shadow, it makes them stand out more.

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Thanks for the advice, and the links to the tools. I'd have never thought of dental files or gem stickers!

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amazing how many useful tools there are in makeup, nail painting, jewelry, dental, tattooing and other beauty aids...

 

dental burs are also useful for your rototool with n scale as they are tiny! you can get them on ebay for 5 for a buck or so.

 

as squid mentioned the bright led torch is really really handy for the ones that do go sproing! spent way too much time on my hands and knees with one in my life looking for tiny parts... move the light from above to sideways at the floor and look for the things that pop a shadow (ie the change in the picture).

 

jeff

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Maybe this is a reasonable thread to add a question I've been wanting to ask.

 

I have Kato 10-1118 / 10-1119 115-800 Series Yokosuka Colour. I've had trouble adding the part at the front that is boxed in the attached picture.

 

Does anyone know whether this should click in somewhere, or does it need to be glued?

 

Ta.

115.jpg

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It fits snugly between the coupler and the simulated electrical connections that make the hook underneath.  I can post some pictures of my instillation on the 115-300 series when I get home in a few hours to show what it looks like, but it holds pretty well without glue.  

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Hello,

 

Got my first one almost done. I have to say almost as I managed to lose one windscreen wiper, and I don't have any spares! 

 

Once again, thanks for the tips and advice, just the rest to to now!

 

One quick question tho, do the decals that come some of the models tend to be water slide ones? 

20171219_113723_resized.jpg

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Depends on the manufacturer. If you're looking at AClass, Kato, KTM, Micro Ace, Tenshodo, Tomix and Tramway RTR models, they usually have rub-on "instant lettering" for locos and cars. For those makers the destination rolls, destination boards, headmarks and other carriage graphics are usually self-adhesive stickers that must be cut out. Kits typically have waterslide decals. 

 

As a general rule, if the lettering is on a transparent plastic sheet with a wax paper backing it's instant lettering, if the lettering is on a paper sheet it's decals, and the stickers are on a very shiny plastic sheet with a thick backing.

 

large.IMG_9828.JPG.610ca501c9b62013d6ac6

Tomix and Kato instant lettering - some of the Kato freight car lettering sheets have a black backing sheet.

 

large.IMG_9829.JPG.a8ce02358824277c9927f

Tomix and Kato sticker sheets.

 

Nice job on the EF65!

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

Edited by marknewton
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Thanks for that, thought i'd have a break from adding parts to loco's, I've got some Kato coaches to add numbers to so thought I'd do those next.

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Lettering for the Kato coaches is printed on the transparent plastic sheets. The way I apply them is slightly fiddly, but it gives a neat result. I use a sharp scalpel to cut the number I want to use out of the sheet while it's still on the backing paper, then I position it on the carriage and hold it in place with a small piece of "magic" adhesive tape - not ordinary sticky tape. The magic tape keeps the lettering from moving while it's being rubbed down, and lifts off the model without damaging the paint or leaving any residue.

 

Patience is the key to success for this task.Turn off your phone, put on some restful music, have plenty of light on your workbench, and you can't go wrong. And use a proper stylus or burnishing tool to rub the letters on.

 

All the best,

 

Mark.

Edited by marknewton
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