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Kamome

Differences in HO models

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I visited the Hara Railway Museum in Yokohama today along with a quick visit to Tenshodo and Imon Models. I wondered why such a differing range of prices across the HO manufacturers.

 

I assume a lot of the more expensive models from Tenshodo and Imon tend to be brass, but wondered what the difference was between some of the Tomix models. The Prestige models were all shown with jumper plugs and brake pipes attached whereas the lower cost version had holes where they should go.

 

Does anyone know whether the lower cost versions are the same but you need to add the parts yourself or whether the bits don't come with the model? There was a good ¥20000-¥30000 difference in price in some cases.

 

I'll leave the brass stuff to those prepared to part with that sort of cash. I can but dream!

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For the Tomix models, generally the difference between Prestige and regular models, is as you say, the applied accessories such as the handrails, windscreen wipers, signal flares, jumpers and some pantographs, although they are metal wire or metal fittings rather than plastic on the regular versions.

 

I personally prefer the Prestige versions because you don't need to muck around with all the bits and pieces.

 

Most of my Tomix HO are the prestige versions; watch out for the Hobby Search sales, as you can often get the Prestige models for not much more than the regular versions. 

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Posted (edited)

Cheers VJM

 

Good to know the difference and I'll keep an eye out on Hobby Search. Don't think I'll be investing in any 16 car Shinkansens but would like the odd JNR loco or 2 with a few coaches or freight. I do quite like the price point of the Kato EF65-1000

Edited by Kamome

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Don't think I'll be investing in any 16 car Shinkansens...

 

Neither did I, but my son had other ideas...

 

gallery_22_222_716247.jpg

 

I do quite like the price point of the Kato EF65-1000

 

I have three of the Kato EF65s - the original 0 series, a 500 and a 1000. They are all very well detailed models with good, powerful mechanisms that run sweetly. The only caveat is that you have to apply the fine detail parts yourself.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

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Thanks Mark

 

My boys are not quite at the age to let loose on the big boy models. My eldest is 2 and getting quite proficient at smooth station stopping with my n gauge stuff. He's more at home with his Enoden pura-rail for the time being.

 

I've definitely been bitten by the HO bug. Like the look of the Tomix DF50 along with the Kato EF65. I should blame you in part for you photos on your photo plank. Very inspiring.

 

I do like the Kato E5 but couldn't accommodate such a long train, hence buying n gauge. I saw a 100 series in HO but it was 5 metres long.

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Posted (edited)

You know the old saying, "Start them while they're young". :)

 

And I reckon having some Enoden trains is a great way to start.

 

I have a pair of the Tomix DF50s, one in grape #2 livery and one in the later red and grey. They're excellent models that are so heavy you'd think they were filled with depleted uranium. They run smoothly and quietly, and can pull an extraordinarily long train on account of their weight. The standard version has a fair number of separate parts you have to apply yourself, however.

 

I'm glad you find the photo plank inspiring, that's one of the reasons I made it. It's made me realise that even a narrow shelf layout can have effective scenery without needing acres of space.

 

The E5 certainly is long, so it only gets a run on the club layout at the moment. But when it does, it turns heads. :)

 

My son Harry was 9 when we bought it, and he's been extremely careful with it from day one. He also started out with simple stuff like Plarail as a toddler, and that's where he learned about taking care of his models. I'm sure as your lads grow older you'll find they do the same.

 

Alll the best,

 

Mark.

Edited by marknewton
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