Jump to content
JNS Forum
Pashina12

Planning Aizu

Recommended Posts

10 hours ago, Pashina12 said:

Well, that's a multi-faceted question. At home, for the moment, not much - about 8' x 2' space that I can use as a "set up and leave it there" space. However, my studio space is about 15' long by 8' wide, and with some rearrangement of my gear (and getting friends to actually take their stuff away that they seem to have "forgotten" there) I could devote one entire long wall to it... though I'd have to wonder A, how would that affect the acoustics of the room (though can't be worse than it is now with people using it as a storage space...), and B, how would occasional long hours of loud noise and the consequent vibrations of heavy bass affect the layout and models...

 

For shorter periods, at home I could set up up to around a 25' length.

Thanks! Well, one thing i noticed is the number or curves on your plans. This could make it really hard to set it up along a wall. The studio environment is also bad for the layout, mainly dust and heavy stuff getting banged into the model landscape. I would expect a layout wouldn't survive a year there.

 

At home, you might have more peace, but not a lot of leave it assembled space. Setting up and tearing down every time you want to run usually means very rare running sessions. This leaves you with the fixed space.

 

So my question is this: How much of the line could you model in 8' x 2'?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The curves: well, for occasional set up at whatever location, the curves could maybe make it possible to have a longer run in a space, than simply going along a wall. At the same time, there is nothing saying I can't replace a curve with a "temporary" straight connection.

 

Also important: none of these are "plans" per se, yet! So far I've only been looking at the line as it is/was... figuring out how to model what is a step yet to come.

 

You're probably right about the studio...

 

As for the 8' x 2' space... well. Not a lot of open line, really, for just running; I could model one of the stations which give me shunting options, which could let me shunt some when I feel like actually playing with the trains without setting multiple modules up. Conversely, since I do enjoy the shunting puzzles, I could just get a bunch of Unitrack, and when I want to play a bit, I can set up a different timesaver/puzzle track plan each time, without regard to what I've got done in modules...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've started planning out the construction of the Kuragawa bridge. In addition to the Central Valley bridge girder pieces, I picked up a Walthers Through-Plate Girder Bridge kit, with the thought of using the webbing under the deck/track, but since have realised that there are a number of other parts I can use from the kit. Compromises... the model isn't going to be hyper-accurate, but it will definitely look the part enough to be recognisable as this specific bridge.

 

Still haven't decided what to tackle next after/in addition to this module, but it's 50/50 between Kamimiyori and Kuwabara/#1 Ogawa Bridge. In any event I think I've finally decided that I'm going to focus on the Kamimiyori - Narahara section of the line, with an unscenicked staging yard to represent Nishi-Wakamatsu and the rest of the world at one end, and Aizu-Takinohara at the other end, skipping over (for the foreseeable future, anyways) everything between Narahara and Takinohara.

 

The idea I have in my head, in terms of modules, is:

 

Staging - Kamimiyori - Kuragawa Bridge - transition into tunnel - tunnel exit/Kuwabara + #1 Ogawa Bridge/tunnel mouth - tunnel exit/#2 Ogawa Bridge/tunnel entry - Yunokami (omitting Onogawa Bridge) - transition - Cliffside viaduct scene - Narahara - transition - Takinohara.

 

This omits three of the Ogawa bridges and several other things (including Yagoshima Station), but it does include *most* of my favourite scenes, and cuts the line down to something manageable, and gives me a somewhat more concrete aim of what I'm doing. And of course it leaves plenty of room for future expansion, but I think it's also important that if this is all that I ever manage to get done, I can be quite content with it from several angles: it'll be visually pleasing and be unquestionably the Aizu Line, and it'll be operationally interesting, too: opportunities for wayfreight work at Kamimiyori, Yunokami, Narahara, and Takinohara, and be plenty long enough to make timetable running of passenger and freight trains interesting and challenging.

 

Actually, Takinohara - even though it's what first attracted me to this line - is the asterisk/"would be nice" part of this vision: I'd be equally content with just the Kamimiyori - Narahara section I described above, as even if everything from Narahara to Takinohara is represented just as an unscenicked staging module, the visual and operational points I made above are still equally valid.

bridge1.jpg

bridge2.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Oh, one other decision I made, whilst working on the bridge plans: I'm not going to go for hyper-accuracy... if an existing structure model is pretty close in appearance, I'll be satisfied with that, even if it's not 100% correct. This will make it easier to achieve my vision, and then down the road - once I've got the bulk of things done - if I feel like it I can always build a more accurate model. My first priority, then, will be to produce something that reproduces the scenes *in general* (such that they elicit a "yeah, that looks like XYZ" reaction from viewers), even if this or that particular element isn't an exact replica of the original. Upgrading to greater accuracy can wait until later.

 

Apologies for making a post just about some mental musings, but with the way my brain works, writing it out like this for others to see makes me perceive it as something more concrete, than if I just think it to myself... if I don't write things out, I'll just keep vacillating, and never get anything done... :)

Edited by Pashina12
Typofix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the update!  Even if there isn't a lot of visible progress, I've found just putting words to paper (or text to screen) is a good way to motivate and to organize your plans on what to do.  I like the use of a locomotive to translate distances from a photo to model form, good way to get the "look" of the scene right. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Playing around a little... KiHa16 38 and KiHa23 504 ready to depart...

20180619_220248.jpg

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great scene!  Love the old Kiha's and buses! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice scene indeed. Are the KiHas sitting on track? Maybe Peco 55?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! Yeah they're on track - a piece of Atlas sectional bridged between two pieces of Unitrack. XD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

So, I've done some more research on the section between Kuwabara and Yunokami - the #1, #2, and #3 Ogawa Bridges, the four Onumazaki Tunnels, and the former Oto Tunnel (the actual name of that tunnel seems unknown now, that name is the name of the new tunnel whose southern mouth it immediately adjacent to the southern mouth of the old tunnel just north of #3 Ogawa Bridge.

 

The old Oto Tunnel was about 300m long. The original tunnel wall was made entirely of concrete bricks, with a lining of poured concrete up until about halfway up the side walls; this was a feature of tunnels built in the late Taisho and early Showa periods. Later, the poured concrete layer on the lower half of the walls was given an extra layer, and a layer of wooden boards was applied to the arch of the ceiling where the brick was exposed; this was fastened in place by iron ribs that ran all the way around the arch from floor to floor. 

 

Another interesting feature was that the ballasting was quite thin - the sleepers were buried halfway into the hard soil, and a thin layer of riverine gravel was poured over top. That river gravel ballast is still there, indicating that it was still that ballast when the old section of the line was abandoned, and that it had last been reballasted - if ever - prior to 1955, as the collection of riverine gravel was banned sometime in the Showa 30s.

 

The inside of the #4 Onumazaki Tunnel was the same as that of the old Oto Tunnel; this was the 400m-long tunnel into which the line went (upwards) immediately off the north end of the #2 Ogawa Bridge. After exiting the #4 tunnel, the line ran through cedar forest.

 

The approach to the southern mouth of #3 Onumazaki Tunnel had a long retaining wall on the cliff side (of the round-rocks-in-concrete variety), and there was a short bridge 30m south of the southern entrance to the tunnel. Unlike the other tunnels, the inside of this very short tunnel was lined entirely in concrete, including on the ceiling. Heading north from the north mouth of the tunnel, the line continued on a ledge between the cliff and the river, with a short retaining wall at the tunnel mouth; adjacent to the line, just north of the tunnel, the old route of the National Highway had a concrete arch bridge.

 

Heading towards the #2 tunnel the line went through a flat plateau of agricultural land south of the village of Koide, where the line made a turn to the east before continuing northwards again. #2 Onumazaki Tunnel was quite short, about 100m in length, and the inside was the same as that of the #4 tunnel.

 

The #1 Onumazaki Tunnel was another extremely short tunnel, but it's at present under water; its north mouth opened directly onto the south end of the #1 Ogawa Bridge.

 

I haven't yet found anything on the old Mukaiyama Tunnel between Kuwabara and Funako, and the old Funako Tunnel between Funako and the Kuragawa Bridge. I think it's safe to assume that the interior of these tunnels was the same as the Oto Tunnel and the #2 and #4 Onumazaki Tunnels. However, I will try to find photos of the tunnel mouths - at least of the north end of the Funako Tunnel and the south end of the Mukaiyama Tunnel; I'm thinking that's somewhere where I can compress the Kamimiyori-Narahara section of the line, omitting Funako.

 

Funako is kinda an interesting spot, though - it wasn't officially considered a station after 1967, but it had a permanent station structure, and all passenger trains stopped there despite the fact that it wasn't officially a station.

 

Another interesting tidbit I discovered about the line... as I'd mentioned before, the line was originally envisioned as part of a "second Tohoku main line" to run from Aizu-Wakamatsu to Tokyo; the first section to be opened, from Nishi-Wakamatsu to Kamimiyori, was opened in 1927 and called the Yagan'u Line (野岩羽線). I've also mentioned in passing another nearby short line, the Nitchuu Line, of about 11 km from Kitakata to Atsushio; well,it seems that that was to be part of the envisioned main line, and its name, Nitchuu, referring (I'm guessing) to "Central Japan" - 日中, might've been the name intended for the completed Wakamatsu-Tokyo line.

Edited by Pashina12
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great project ! When did you will start the build ? I will be happy to see that construction !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well... that's an interesting question! I've started cutting some parts for the Kuragawa Bridge, having decided that the first section I want to focus on is Kamimiyori - Narahara. But since then I've decided to further narrow that down, to start with the section between the south end of the Mukaiyama Tunnel and the #1 Onumazaki Tunnel - that is, to model Kuwabara and the #1 Ogawa Bridge first. I've started sketching some things I'll need to build, namely the #1 Onumazaki Tunnel and the water tower at Kuwabara. I've also started looking at how I'll compress the station area; I'll use the Tomix island platform set, kitbashed to suit. There's also the main station building and a secondary building at Kuwabara. I've only found a couple of partial views of the station building itself, so for that I'll just go "close enough" and use the MicroAce/Arii #10 Station kit; for the secondary building, I'll be using one of the Kato section houses, perhaps with some modifications if necessary. Then there will be the bigger task of drawing out the #1 Ogawa Bridge and the road bridge alongside. For the #1 Ogawa Bridge, since it's a fairly simple deck girder bridge, I'll be looking into what readily available deck girder bridge kits I can use/adapt for the role.

 

I want to start building these structures first, as then I can lay them out and work out accurately how to arrange and build the modules themselves on which they'll be placed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×