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cteno4

lasercut industrial building

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cteno4

For those wanting a larger industrial building a US company does a sugar beet plant that could be anywhere really. they do it in brick, concrete on brick and concrete on concrete surface and a few different roof textures.

 

looks pretty nice and like a lot of nondescript japanese concrete built industrial structures.

 

https://squareup.com/store/bergen-national-laser/  << note shop is not being used for orders!!!

 

http://www.model160.com/n-scale-news-blog/bergen-national-laser-releases-sugar-beet-refinery/

 

only rub is not sure he is currently producing them, i have a call into him.

 

jeff

Edited by cteno4

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velotrain

I spoke with him at his stand at the NNGC in Augusta, Maine, in September and saw this structure.

 

It's a fairly recent line, so I would think that everything he shows is available.

 

My general impression was that he offers high quality designs at a very reasonable price.

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cteno4

Charles,

 

Thanks! Yes it looked good and well designed and reasonably priced for the size. Looked like it can be morphed into any number of industrial buildings, especially in cement.

 

His site is down and I saw on another forum that in November last year he had to take a break from the business. Don't know if it's going again or not and maybe just the square shopping system was still up drift netting. I left a message to see if he is open for business now.

 

Jeff

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velotrain

That (perhaps) explains something that puzzled me - wondering why he didn't have photos illustrating the various siding options he offers.

 

Back in September I wondered if he would be able to survive offering such high quality kits for such low (reasonable) prices.

 

I mean, they might pay for his actual material and labor costs, but it's such a competitive market to start out in, and he also needs to pay for tools and utilities and hopefully make a living for him and his wife.

 

I was impressed with the realism / believability of his offerings.

 

I hope he kept his day job!

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cteno4

Some guys do custom stuff so the tools (ie lasercutter) is already there and this is a way to help bring in another revenue stream. if he does custom work then he has most of the files needed to design the structures easily and labor then is pretty low just loading files and chipboard to do runs. packaging is minimal. big cost is the high quality laserboards. but like you said they did seem good for the price! 

 

A friend use to do a lot of architectural models (high end houses for architects) as a sideline to his exhibit design/fabrication business as he had a lasercutter and it was a way to make a fast buck using the laser cutter. plans were already there, pretty quick to lift out what he needed and then a few days of a kids time (he hired young to collage kids) to assemble. worked great till the big 3d power printers got affordable enough for the architects offices to buy them and just print out their own with no assembly needed! we looked at perhaps coming up with some kits, but he is in California so a little hard for us to work long distance and a bit of a curve designing all our own buildings. Then he took a day job so that dimmed sidelines.

 

jeff

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cteno4

So i talked with the owner and the current status is he may do one more run here in the next few weeks and then shut down the biz for now.

 

So if anyone is interested pm me by the end of the month and i can put you in contact with him about anything you may want to purchase. prices did go up a little from the old cart system above (its no longer being used and he thought it was turned off).

 

sad as it looks like a great product!

 

jeff

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Martijn Meerts

Definitely tempting.. The full kit like shown on the 2nd link, with the rusting roof looks really good.

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marknewton

For those wanting a larger industrial building a US company does a sugar beet plant that could be anywhere really. they do it in brick, concrete on brick and concrete on concrete surface and a few different roof textures. looks pretty nice and like a lot of nondescript japanese concrete built industrial structures.

Yes, Jeff, I can't help noticing how similar the kit looks to these two sugar beet mills from Hokkaido:

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ja/3/3c/HokkaidoSeito-ObihiroKojo.jpg

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ja/3/30/MeijiSeito-ShimizuKojo.jpg

 

(Both of which were served by the 762mm gauge Tokachi Railway.)

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

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cteno4

Mark,

 

Cool it had the look I had seen from 20th century brick and or cement construction of these kinds of facilities, cool to see something very close in Japan.

 

Jeff

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ben_issacs

Folks, 

These sugar mills take up a lot of space, probably difficult to set up on a normal layout. 

And, as an aside, did they actually grow sugar cane in Hokkaido, I would have thought that the climate there would be far too cold for this crop!

Regards, 

Bill, 

Melbourne.

 

 

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Nick_Burman
1 hour ago, ben_issacs said:

did they actually grow sugar cane in Hokkaido

 

Sugar beet! 🙂

 

Cheers NB

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Nick_Burman
On 1/19/2017 at 6:30 PM, cteno4 said:

Mark,

 

Cool it had the look I had seen from 20th century brick and or cement construction of these kinds of facilities, cool to see something very close in Japan.

 

Jeff

 

Rather unsurprising, given the fact that much of Hokkaido's development was done with the help of American experts.

 

Cheers NB

 

 

 

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ben_issacs

Nick, 

Thanks for the comment about growing sugar in Hokkaido, I'd not considered sugar beet for a crop there.

Of course, this is done in Europe, with climates not much different from southern Hokkaido.

And the North American influence in Hokkaido was strong in the early days, an American chap, whose name escapes me, was apparently an advisor to the Hokkaido Government, and introduced several N.A. practices there.

Many of their farm buildings look very U.S. Mid Western, and the first railway, in 1880, the Hokkaido Steamship and Colliery Railway, was out and out U.S., even though 3'-6" gauge, with pretty little 2-6-0 tender engines with wooden cowcatchers (pilots), multiple sand domes, bells , big wooden cabs, bogie tenders, etc.

Regards,

Bill, 

Melbourne.

 

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