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nah00

Using modelling clay for filler for scenery

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nah00

So I've been looking at how to satisfactorily blend the approach to my elevated tracks and I saw a video on YouTube where someone used modelling clay to build a beach scene. Has anyone ever used this before? Obviously I'm not making mountains out of it, I was just going to use it to blend in approach tracks, tunnel mouths, and the beach in my little harbor. I don't care too much about cracking (it'll be covered by ballast/sand/turf) but I wonder if it has a problem with flaking and ending up inside an engine.

 

This was the clay I was thinking of using:

post-3438-0-20893600-1476984678_thumb.jpg

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valkyriepm

I've used it on my micro layout for making the asphalt on the center of the track and it worked great, pretty solid. Use a little water to finish it smoothly.

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nah00

Huh I didn't think of using it for that but it sounds a lot easier than trying to cut styrene to fit.

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cteno4

Yes and it cleans out a lot better from the flange way than plaster! That is a mess.

 

Yes the poly clays that harden up when exposed to air for a few days works well for filling in little bits here and there and blending things. Easy to work with, not messy, and easy to clean up. Different brands have different densities and drying times and final hardnesses. Like you mention good for smaller areas, plaster cloth, paper mache, etc works better for larger spreads and can be a little more forgiving, lighter and cheaper, test the drying and hardness of what you get before throwing it on the layout.

 

You can use clay tools easily on it to help shape things.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-Set-14PC-Flower-Modeling-Craft-Fondant-Cake-Decorating-Clays-Sugarcraft-Tools-/121672321231?hash=item1c543c48cf:g:0okAAOSwBLlVdRLo

 

Of course you can make your own tools out of found bits in your scrap box as well,

 

Cheers,

 

Jeff

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railsquid

I use modelling clay (a brand available in Japan) for forming ground on smaller scenic sections (not that I have any larger scenic sections), works very well except it's hard to get a completely flat surface, I find plaster better for that. It also contracts a bit when it dries so is difficult to use for precision work (e.g. embedding rail). It may crack a little when drying but doesn't flake and is very stable, especially when painted.

 

29825171183_778526e163_z.jpg

eitetsumura-tunnel-scenery-1 by Rail Squid, on Flickr

 

30340831942_d3e404cfcc_z.jpg

eitetsumura-tunnel-scenery-2 by Rail Squid, on Flickr

 

30421161946_1afae08b94_z.jpg

eitetsumura-tunnel-scenery-3 by Rail Squid, on Flickr

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Kabutoni

I've also used modelling clay (or stone powder clay) to embed tracks. The tracks embed fine, but you have to indeed watch out for shrinking. Flat surfaces are difficult, but you can eventually also scrape a pattern or something in it once completely dry. This way you can simulate bricks or stones, as can still be found on old tram tracks in Japan (until recently Fukui Dentetsu had quite a bit). It's a good replacement as a filler for small holes.

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velotrain

I don't know about overseas availability of similar products, but Durham's Water Putty is also a very good material for this sort of application.  Being wood based, it takes sanding very well, and although it gets mixed with water they claim no shrinkage.

 

Here are images of it being used as a landscape base for a Fn2 (using O-gauge track) micro, both before and after the rail was laid.  The areas where it wasn't applied will contain structures.

 

 

gallery_941_192_234283.jpg

 

 

gallery_941_192_139409.jpg

 

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