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NX:

Starting it over (hopefully) soon with new ideas and projects.

 

Cheers,

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NX:

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JR 500系

Looks like a mighty interesting project! I would love to see it build up!  :)

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HantuBlauLOL

following!

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kvp

Interedting!

 

A few comments:

-you might want to make a list of the signal types, i see entry, exit, shunt, block and pre signals

-imho the crossing should be in the interlocking system

-you might wish to add movement based cab selection with analog blocks

-and finally, you have to select an interlocking type from a lever frame to ctc and an implementation from mechanical to computer based (and everything in between in both cases)

 

ps: with clever design, it could be possible to have a generic interface and build multiple interchangable interlocking systems based on different technologies and control methods

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NX:

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NX:

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NX:

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NX:

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JR 500系

Thank you Nxcale for these informative posts!

 

I've yet to see the bus turntable being motorised, but I do see a potential there... But i'm too much of an electronics nerd to overcome this...

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kvp

The bus turntable is just for turning 180 degrees with a stopped bus. You could use a servo for turning the table and another to move a stop magnet. I would mount the turntable directly on the larger servo's main axle and add a small 180 degree cutout slot into the base for the stop magnet. If it's strong enough then it can act through the two layers of plastic. The stop magnet and it's servo could be mounted to move with the turntable. An alternative is to use a small electromagnet glued to the bottom of the top piece and rotating with the turntable in the half circle slot mentioned above.

 

Both methods will have two switches: stop/go and 0/180 degrees.

 

Its also possible to use a stepper motor to rotate the table and you can use a slot guide to move the stop magnet in a position dependent way, resulting in an automatic stop and go operation.

 

For guide wires, i would put two sloping side guide wires to the entry end of the turntable and the same to the exit point on the ground. The entry and exit points could be on the same wire or two separate wires next to each other. The first requires a passive turnout like in the BRT set while the two wire method requires less than 180 degrees or turn.

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NX:

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JR 500系

Very nice! Thank you for sharing!

 

The wires are very thin, and I've tried using steel wires that are used to tie reinforcement bars used in construction, but they tend to be too thick and the magnet sticks the bus right on the road and it doesn't move....

 

The video is nice, the Hakone Primary School kids must like the bus turning round! I guess it has to be slow to be safe and also not give the bus passengers a spinning headache... What puzzles me is what the blue truck was doing/ coming from in 0:05 of the video... It seems to be a one way road with a distinct 'No entry' sign painted on the road and the truck actually came out of it from the other direction...

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NX:

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cteno4

Nxscale,

 

The biggest issue with the guide rail wire is something that works well with the magnets! Some wires made of iron but alloyed for corrosion resistance decrease this a lot! With the old faller bus I tested a lot of wires I had around here and I had some light steel wire that was already oxidizing some that was great along with one particular floral wire I had. Most others did not do well, in particular most all the jewelry wire I had. The roll faller sells oxidizes as well so low carbon and other alloy elements!

 

So it can be a bit of trial and error. At least the new Tomytec busses have stronger magnets than the old faller busses did.

 

Cheers

 

Jeff

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NX:

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JR 500系

Oh wow it looks like complicated fun! Very nice! I like how you organise the cables together neatly. I might steal that idea for my layout too!  :)

 

Thanks for sharing!

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NX:

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JR 500系

Wow I liked it! Thank you so much for sharing!

 

The speed is good too, just the right speed. The reverse is a little too fast though...

 

Would love to see it integrated into the moving bus system! that would totally rock! 

 

Cheers!

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kvp

Looks good!

 

 

 

Would love to see it integrated into the moving bus system! that would totally rock! 

Imho tomix would probably use something more simple, like a DC motor with a screw drive hidden in a building next to the turntable (and two end switches). And i think a fixed cut out circle shaped stop magnet would also work fine, with the bus stopped at every possible position, except fully rotated. (this would automate the release) I think that would be the minimal part count, no underfloor equipment solution, controllable with one polarity switch (already in production).

 

ps: It's possible to make a single cut out circle shaped magnet from small block magnets glued to the static base in an open circle. The sensor in the bus would move above these magnets, until it finds the hole when facing in the out direction and start moving.

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