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Found 13 results

  1. Some fresh electrons from Railfan News: by the end of 2019, JR Central will have a hybrid 4-car test formation. This will be a 4-car limited express type, which, if all goes well, will replace the KIHA85 someday. The KIHA85 is currently used on the Hida and Nanki services. JRC intends this to be the first Japanese hybrid to have an operational top speed of 120km/h. As I understand the article, batteries will be charged by both a diesel with alternator as well as regenerative braking. EMU-style traction motors will draw power from those batteries to propel the cars. This will reduce both cost and maintenance time. There will be only one engine per car, it will be silent during station stops, and this drive system lacks a gearbox, all contributing to an improvement in passenger comfort. Also, this type is expected to use 15% less fuel. If all goes well during one year of testing this prototype formation, endurance testing will begin (I'm not sure if this means revenue service or not). Following that, production cars could be manufactured in 2022. http://railf.jp/news/2017/06/08/090000.html
  2. source, with additional maps/diagrams: https://www.texascentral.com/2018/01/29/north-texas-bullet-train-station/
  3. Some updates to JRC's Hamamatsu Shinkansen shop have been featured on Shizuoka Broadcasting's YT channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEXXi8XQ2sI
  4. Looks like the JR Central 371 series has its last run coming up. Used until March 2012 on the Asagiri service that interchanged with Odakyu, it was used on "Nakasendo Train" service, running between Nagoya and Narai on the Chuo Line, as well as charter services since autumn 2012. This series consists of only 1 7-car train. It was built in 1991, but appears to be in fine condition. I'm not sure what to expect but I will be a bit shocked if it's actually scrapped. btw, DAJF doesn't have this on Wikipedia yet http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/nws001541.html http://rail-uploader.khz-net.com/index.php?id=30178 previous threads: http://www.jnsforum.com/community/topic/8028-jr-central-narai-to-nagoya-on-the-nakasendo-train/ http://www.jnsforum.com/community/topic/3058-jr-series-371/
  5. Was a rare oportunity to visit those vehicles only 2 days 10/10 and 10/11, inside have a pictures to how was build and some new papers saying about the new tech for future shinkansen trains, i was alowed for only 1 minute in the drive seat :( The 300X JRCentral later 700 Series, STAR21 JREast E2, E3 and WIN350 JRWest 500 Series are all experimental vehicles that were used to test high-speed technology for future shinkansen. Not only are these trains on display, but visitors can actually go inside them. edit: i upload all the pics from my quick visit there so enjoy :D
  6. The Takayama Line's KIHA40 and KIHA48 DMUs saw their last run on June 30th. These were based at Mino-Ota. They'll be replaced by KIHA25s removed from the Taketoyo Line following its electrification. KIHA40s have already been removed from the Taita Line (anyone ever actually ride this? :)) From July 1st, all local service on the Takayama Line between Gifu and Inotani will be operated by KIHA25 and KIHA75 DMUs. The last KIHA40 service was train 1731D which departed Gifu at 7:09 PM for Shimo-asō. JR Central continues to run KIHA40s on the Kise and Sangu lines, but there are already plans to replace them with KIHA25s, and plans to retire all JNR-era DMUs within the year. There will be a public announcement regarding the transfer of retired DMUs to Myanmar. http://railf.jp/news/2015/07/02/100000.html Last run, 1731D at Gifu, by hakase1990: 8-car formation (not in service) moving from Mino-Ota Station to the yard. Apparently these have Cummins engines. By AKE BOVOAKE:
  7. http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/social_affairs/AJ201409180073 *not mentioned here, but mentioned in the original Japanese print article, the actual main purpose of the speed-up is not to reduce the total travel time (though that is the general public advertising point) , but rather to facilitate faster timetable recovery in instances of accidents, bad weather, etc. Back in JNR days, the average delay in shinkansen services (in one year) typically ranged over two minutes, while this past decade, this has been reduced to under a minute- in the case of 2003, six seconds. However, last year, the average delay figure rose to 54 seconds. Presumably this technical development will help get that number back down again.
  8. Did anyone post this yet? http://en.rocketnews24.com/2014/09/07/the-most-crowded-train-lines-during-rush-hour-in-tokyo-osaka-and-nagoya-are/ Pretty interesting, data is apparently from MLIT, so I think it's trustworthy. I never lived in Kanto, so the figures for those lines don't mean a lot to me, other than explaining why JR East buys so many new trains . The figures for Osaka and Nagoya, however, help me picture train interiors, platforms, and seas of people at the gates :). The private railways really take the prize in Osaka, and in Nagoya, the municipal subway system appears the most in the list. Also interesting to see how Meitetsu places. JR Central only appears once, at number 5, further reinforcing my impression that they probably don't want to worry about the zairai lines too much :).
  9. Filed in FWIW category, but somewhat interesting... http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2014/8/19/debt-capital-markets/high-speed-rail-may-receive-japanese-backing
  10. Not really news anymore, but on Ompuchaneru I just noticed this pdf (dated March 27th) from JR Central: http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/_pdf/000021810.pdf In the zairai line section, there's news about more 313 series EMUs and KIHA25 series DMUs, which look exactly like 313s. Electrification of the Taketoyo Line should be complete in spring of next year, and service will be operated by EMUs starting in June according to English Wikipedia. 28 new 313s will be built this year in preparation for this. On the DMU side of things, only 5 2-car sets of KIHA25s have been built, but they're getting 52 more, 16 this year and the remaining 36 next year. These will replace KIHA40s, of which JRC has 59, according to both English and Japanese Wikipedias. So, either 7 KIHA40s are safe or they're reducing numbers a bit. KIHA11s are post-privatization (1988), so if what I read is correct, they're safe. I've read that over the long term, electrics are cheaper to operate than diesels. Assuming that's true, I often wonder why there isn't more electrification when significantly large fleets of DMUs are ready for retirement. If electricity is more expensive in the last 3 years, surely that isn't expected to be permanent, and you can't depend on the cost of diesel fuel anyway.
  11. Well I hear crickets, so I'm going to try to make some noise today . First up, a video by dbz586601. He's one of the best uploaders I've found for coverage of JR Central and Tokai-area private railways, and he's been quite prolific over the past week or so with dozens of uploads of run-bys as well as a few zenmen tenbou videos. Here we have JR Central's Nakasendo Train, a new special service apparently classified as a kyuko (non-limited express, with a lower surcharge) on the Chuo West Line run with the former Asagiri 371 Series rolling stock. This two-part video is a ride departing Narai at 3:42 PM, which is over halfway to Nagano from Nagoya. The Shinano limited express uses the same route. Plenty of footage of rural scenery in the first video, and in the second, a cool night view, particularly towards the end. The departure at Tajimi, the last stop before Nagoya, is at 28:15, and by this point the sun has set. I think at 39:00 they're passing Jinryo Station and Depot. The approach to Nagoya starts around 46:50, passing under the #2 Nagoya Loop Highway, and crossing the Shonai River just after that. This river is the northeastern border of the city, and past that is Shin-Moriyama, the first station in the city limits. Have a look at the link below about the Nakasendo, very interesting. It appears that the modern Chuo West Line is roughly parallel, just as the Tokaido Main Line and Shinkansen are parallel to the historical Tokaido. Narai to Ena Ena to Nagoya map of the five historical routes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:JP_-Gokaido.png the Nakasendo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakasend%C5%8D Ena Station: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ena_Station the train's schedule on ekikara.jp: http://ekikara.jp/newdata/detail/2301021/68553.htm
  12. So I'm pruning my YT subscriptions, and of course I'm still subscribing to RailKingJP's channel, but I thought I'd check out a few of his more recent videos. In this installment, he stands just below a bridge that carries the Tokaido Shinkansen over the Sagami River. Looks risky. location of bridge: https://maps.google.co.jp/maps?hl=ja&ll=35.390926,139.373937&spn=0.003582,0.005381&t=h&z=18&brcurrent=3,0x6019ab4b1a823665:0xd50a2e859d1939a1,1
  13. Here's a very good zenmen tenbou video of JR Central's Central Liner by YT uploader aomonoya. The rolling stock is JRC 313 series, although it's the 8000 subseries which has a different livery and interior. There are 6 3-car sets of these, all based at Jinryo Depot, between Kasugai and Jinryo on the Chuo Line. This is set B206 as you can see in the lower corner of the windshield. Presumably aomonoya decided to document this because JRC will replace the Central Liner services with regular rapid services with the March 16 2013 timetable revision. I haven't seen anything about the fate of this 8000 subseries rolling stock, obviously it's very new so it won't be scrapped but whether it will be modified to match the other variants, it will be interesting to see. There are liner services with each of the JR companies except Shikoku, and also with several private railways, although they have other names. The surcharge structure used for these liner trains seems to be very similar to non-limited express (kyuko) services which are now almost all gone. This is also a good look at the Chuo West Line, which are fairly rare on YT as compared to the eastern portion, particularly Tokyo to Takao/Otsuki. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/313_series#313-8000_series http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Liner 8000 subseries interior images: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/mlnagara373/40934565.html, http://www.uraken.net/rail/alltrain/uratetsu313.html
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